10% commission difference

Hi,

My first post as I’m new to this industry. I welcome everyone’s experience and opinion. I have the opportunity to pick between 2 roofing companies to work for in Dallas TX area. Suppose 2 companies are pretty much equal but the diffence is 10% in commission. In exchange for giving up the 10% amount the company with the lower commission has canvassers ahead of me knocking door’s getting the leads and then I focus on the selling. Is this worth it? Appears that I might save alot of knocking and wasting time or do you think as a newbie I must knock to gain experience or what? The highest commission has no canvassars of course or leads. What questions do you have for me? Let me know. Glad to be your peer.

I see that this post has been “liked” 2 times. What does that do or mean for a post? Just wondering but dont want that question to take over the post. Thanks for your time.

Out of curiosity some random questions.

What qualifies you to be an effective closer if you are given leads? Do you have a sales background? Roofing background?
Why would a roofing company give you highly qualified leads without relevant experience.

Do both companies pay you commission off the total job including backend money? Will both open up their books to show you actual job costs?

I love leads and referrals but having knocked a lot of doors makes me appreciate them even more. Not saying that’s the only route. Just wondering what I learned knocking doors that I might not have otherwise.

This question isn’ttotally valid as no two companies are created equal. Just for the sake of argument though, we’ll assume in this instance they are exactly equal EXCEPT for Canvassers vs Own Leads and commission difference. If in fact they canvassing can produce you with several quality leads per day, I’d do that all day long. Put me in front of several people per day that I can actually talk to, I’d kill it. The tough part is knocking doors all day and not getting to talk to anybody. Now if reality turns out the leads suck and most of your sales end up coming from your own efforts, obviously the thing to do would be go for the higher commission.

I think I’d try to negotiate with the lower commission company where any jobs you sign from their leads is lower commission but if you sign a job from your own canvassing efforts, commission goes up. That way you’ve covered your bases.

I’ll add another suggestion. Be so good and so productive that you can name your own terms.

I am somewhat familiar with DFW companies. Care to share the initials of the two companies?

[quote=“kendge”]Out of curiosity some random questions.

What qualifies you to be an effective closer if you are given leads? Do you have a sales background? Roofing background?
Why would a roofing company give you highly qualified leads without relevant experience.

Do both companies pay you commission off the total job including backend money? Will both open up their books to show you actual job costs?

I love leads and referrals but having knocked a lot of doors makes me appreciate them even more. Not saying that’s the only route. Just wondering what I learned knocking doors that I might not have otherwise.[/quote]

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Kendge,

Thanks for your prompt response. Some roofing companies think that I can become successful in Roofing sales. I interviewed an they offered a position. I did not ask them for leads. It’s part of the 10% lower commission company package.

Yes, off the total & o&p, etc.

Both say they will provide copies of receipts for everything from buying the shingles to returns of overages,etc.

Let me know what you may have learned knocking doors that you might not have if you didn’t if think of them.

Thanks again.

A_D,
Thanks for your input. Very wise comment and advice that I will use. It makes sense.

Thanks.

Please don’t take my comments wrong. I wish you every success and your handle suggests you have the right attitude.

My remarks are probably aimed more at the companies themselves. What kind of training are they offering you?
What do they expect you to know before you go to close your first lead. Too many companies just throw people out there to swim or sink. Roofing companies will hire anyone. After all most are pure commission so they win if you succeed and lose nothing if you fail.

I agree with AD. Give me several leads a day and I will close them all day long. Sure beats the heck out of door knocking.

But if I owned a company I would never give a lead to someone who wasn’t thoroughly trained or had solid sales experience and even then I would want them to understand the business. A lead is too valuable a thing to waste on inexperience.

Your attitude and enthusiasm will go a long way to making you successful. But knowledge and support are more important at least initially. I’ve seen too many enthusiastic people fail for lack of both.

If I were you I would be less concerned with the commission rate and more concerned with which company has the system, support and training to help me become successful.

If you prove yourself, you can write your own ticket later.

Kendage,
Your response has helped me to avoid a mistake I’ve made in the past and that is “seeing the money first”. You’re correct that without a support system this road will be really rough. Is 1 day classroom and 1 day of canvasing training pretty standard in the industry?

I don’t know what is standard but I would suspect that is about what most companies offer.
Is it adequate? NO!

You have the choice of two companies.
Both probably offer inadequate training.
Go with the one you think has the best training and support.

But then soak up everything you can.
Spend a day watching and learning how a roof is installed.
Shadow an experienced salesperson.
Knock your own doors to learn to read people quickly.
Learn how to sell yourself (not the company or the product) in the first 15 seconds.
Read everything you can. This site is a great start.
Ask questions of everyone in the business. Lots of questions.

Good luck.

First thing is make sure they will open the job files so you can see what each job really costs. There are alot of 10 50/50 splits that really aren’t a true 50% split. One day isn’t enough training, heck, I don’t think there is a training program out there that will fully prepare you for this type of job. As soon as you think you have it all figured out you will have a curve ball thrown right at you.

You do need good quality training but you will quickly notice that you’re going to run into situations/homeowners that no training can prepare you for!

RoofNRun,

Are the situations you refer to things that common sense and people skills can help solve or more like roofing specific type of issues that come up alot? If the latter, would you provide an example? Thanks.

A_Dad,
The pictures in your album are helpful. Thanks.

If the two companies you are thinking about working for have skilled shingle installers putting the roof on will be the easy part. You are dealing with many different customers which means many different personalities. Once you sell the job the difficult thing is collecting ALL your money. To answer your question you asked recently one challenge you will run into is dealing with homeowners who lack common sense.

I am always investigating online for tips that can benefit me. Thanks www.roofing.com

RoofnRun,

Ok thank you. I’m starting to run into that already.

Welcome Merrie1990,

I believe you are in the correct spot. This site, contractortalk.com, roofingtalk.com & youtube is how I have been picking up online tips. This, 2 days training and common sense has made me a “project manager”. I now sell roofs.

Bloody noses are an essential part of learning how to be an effective salesman. When I hired salesmen in the past, I gave them a choice. They could either take a punch from my biggest roofer or get their bloody nose the way we all did…getting doors slammed in their faces. Being able to create business is the most important part of learning how to become a hard charger. It hardens your guts and builds a resolve that 95% of the salesmen say they have, but know deep down the still get nervous when asked to make a cold call. After you’ve sold a few million and been doing this a few years, I say fine, take a job as a closer. Until then, do it all. Knock on doors until your knuckles are bleeding as bad as your nose. I promise it will make you a better salesman later. It actually might turn you into a businessman some day.

I am a General Manager in the DFW area. If you would like to give me a call you are more than welcome too it. I would love to help you and give you any of my own opinions to your questions. My number is 214-206-5725.