Architectural vs 3 tab and pitch of roof

I live in North Carolina and it’s time for a new roof. I have a standard ranch house - pitch on main roof is 4/12. Pitch over carport is 2/12 and pitch of overhang over front porch is 3/12.

Cost of architectural will be about $900 more than the 3 tab. Some have told me that because of the low pitch of my roof, I really won’t gain much visual effect. Would you concur? And even if that is true, is the architectural worth $900 to gain an additional 5 year warranty?

Also - do you see any problems with using architectural shingles on those 2/12 or 3/12 areas if winterguard is laid down first?

Thanks,
Mark

If you are going to use shingles all the way to have the same color? Then I reccomend using 3-tab on your 2/12 and 3/12 pitches, then transition to the architectual on the remaining house.

Ideally…I would use granulated torch to match color on the lower pitch.

You will have more problems with arch on the low pitch.

If you shingle that low of a pitch make sure you use ice & water shield on the whole thing rather than just the eaves.

[quote=“Roofer Gee”]If you are going to use shingles all the way to have the same color? Then I reccomend using 3-tab on your 2/12 and 3/12 pitches, then transition to the architectual on the remaining house.

Ideally…I would use granulated torch to match color on the lower pitch.

You will have more problems with arch on the low pitch.[/quote]

That is what I’d do. Torch-applied APP Mod. Bit. on the 2:12 & 3:12, then shingles on the 4:12. The key there is to extend the mod. bit. up beneath the shingles properly, and not to bring the shingle roof down too low where nail penetrations create leaks.

I’m not a roofer so not sure what torch-applied APP Mod.Bit is. :frowning: I do want to shingle the overhang over the front porch for appearance sake as that is visible from the street. I was planning to use ice and water shield on the entire overhang as well as the carport. I’m not sure if my original question got answered here, which was whether arch.shingle was worth $900 vs 3 tab, if you couldn’t really tell the visual diff from the street, or do you think the inherent quality of the architectural makes it a no-brainer? I would think 3 tab on the overhangs and then architectural on the upper would look a bit odd. That’s why I’m leaning towards the 3 tab.

Thanks so much for your contributions. This is helping. I should also mention that I’m 60 years old, so if I can get 25 years out of a roof and am still kicking, I’ll be happy. :slight_smile:

I would 3-tab it all.

I think that the most important thing you can do is use hot dipped galvanized nails in the shingles.

Tinner has a 2 pitch roof he shingled about 12 years ago in our area with arcs. Ice shield, dutch lapped ends, and HDG nails. No problems so far.

[quote=“shangle_nailer”]
Tinner has a 2 pitch roof he shingled about 12 years ago in our area with arcs. Ice shield, dutch lapped ends, and HDG nails. No problems so far.[/quote]

Yes but he’s thinkin appearance as well, I would do what RooferGee said.

***Here are the answers to your questions…
**
*Some have told me that because of the low pitch of my roof, I really won’t gain much visual effect.

If the street hieght is low…you probably won’t see the low pitch. If your house foundation is lower than the street view…then you will see everything.

**is the architectural worth $900 to gain an additional 5 year warranty? **

The extra cost is warranted as 3-tab does not hold up in storms very well…You will definately exceed $900 in repairs/insurance deductables over the lifetime if you chose to do 3-tab all the way.

The 3-tab will give you a max life of about 15 years and arch shingle may last 17-20 years. A 30 yr 3-tab or 30 yr arch shingle will never last thier lifetime.

Also - do you see any problems with using architectural shingles on those 2/12 or 3/12 areas if winterguard is laid down first?

Never use arch shingles on any pitch lower than 4/12.

***If you stake an importance on having a quality roof…Then follow my ideal installation as others have agreed with.

If looks are more important…Then 3-tab it all the way.***

[quote=“kage”]

[quote=“shangle_nailer”]
Tinner has a 2 pitch roof he shingled about 12 years ago in our area with arcs. Ice shield, dutch lapped ends, and HDG nails. No problems so far.[/quote]

Yes but he’s thinkin appearance as well, I would do what RooferGee said.[/quote]

No doubt that a low slope roof system is preferable. I agree 100%.

At the risk of speaking for Tinner, he has told me the reason he used arcs on that roof was for additional coverage, not looks as opposed to a 3-tab. By dutchlapping the ends, you have double coverage over the whole roof. With 3 tabs, it will always be single coverage in the keyways.

For me, jury is still out on whether 3 tabs are better than arcs on low pitch. I haven’t seen enough to convince me one way or the other yet.


Thought pic of back of house showing pitch over carport might be of help. Now if I can find pic of front of house. :slight_smile: Turbines will be removed and ridge vent put in their place. Current roof is about 15 years old - 3 tab shingle. Water had damaged sections on carport part of roof. In the 5 years I’ve lived here, no shingles have come off.

IB has a single ply(pvc)roof with a shingle pattern on it.

@Johnk - Not sure I understand your comment?

Ib is a flat roof/low pitch membrane that is screwed to the deck and seams are air weld for water tightness.

They have several color shades, black, tan, red to match standard shingle colors.

I havn’t checked on it, but they probably have one that looks like shingles (Patterns of a roof…Like what they do for laminate flooring.)

[quote=“Roofer Gee”]Ib is a flat roof/low pitch membrane that is screwed to the deck and seams are air weld for water tightness.

They have several color shades, black, tan, red to match standard shingle colors.

I havn’t checked on it, but they probably have one that looks like shingles (Patterns of a roof…Like what they do for laminate flooring.)[/quote]

They have one that looks like an architechural(laminate)shingle

You may get a couple more years out of laminated shingles but on a low pitch roof over a single story house … it may not be the look you want. Spend a little time looking at other roofs in your subdivision, there are bound to be examples of both. I would have gotten 3-tab for my two story if it was available in the color I wanted (Owens Corning did NOT want me to have Antique Silver in St. Louis). To me a good 3-tab installation looks sharp; laminated shingles are the roofers equivalent of a dry wall contractor applying texture (a.k.a. spit-balls) to a ceiling: it can cover a multitude of sins.

It sounds like the pro’s have it right about the carport. The Owens Corning website does list minimum pitch for their shingles, along with nailing patterns for the different slopes.

Good Luck!

You will not get any visual (aesthetic) benefit from using an architectural shingle on such a low pitch(ed) roof. Since the cost is significantly higher ($900), I would not do it.

However, if you must, architectural shingles can be used on that roof if an "ice and water shield is placed on the roof deck first, instead of felt.

Instead of “torch-down” modified rolled roofing. (I don’t like the thought of a house burning down), why not a modified self-adhered roofing material with a color that matches your shingles? Unfortunately, here in NC, it is not a good time to use the modified self-adhered unless it is about 50 degrees or above.

Hope this helps.

I wan to put solar panels on a low pitched roof that had prior leaks. My dilemma is putting on a non-architectural roof that may not last as long as the panels.

dont matter what u put on the roof it will be good if installed right, remember if you total ice guard the project, increase your vent, if you do go 3 tab run low exposure