Blocked by roofing co sent out by Ins. co to do inspection

We do a lot of commercial and residential for over 10 years, but just recently started doing insurance claims on residential. So I am learning by experience in that area.

Troubling Scenerio I had - We had a homeowner call us ( he saw 3 houses we did and liked our work and saw a yard sign. He even asked 2 of the homeowners how we were to work with and those homeowners said we were 110% great to work with ) so he had me do the roof inspection. I told him yes wind damage some hail so go ahead and call in the claim and went over our agreement of us working with insurance proceeds , we use Xactimate etc., etc.

He called in the claim and all was well until the adjuster from Mutual said he was too busy from hurricane Irene so he sent out another roofing co. to do the inspection…ugh!!

So , I made sure I was there when the other “roofer” showed up . He climbed on the roof for NOT EVEN 2 MINUTES ( I guess he saw enough and obviously had his sights honed in for the kill/sale$$$ ) But still a 1.5 minute inspection , very shady, it wasnt really obvious wind damage . It took me 15-20 just to find most of it ( creased shingles mainly )

Anywho, he came down and , right infront of me , said to the homeowner " okay sir, the roof is totaled, now you know of course you dont have to use this guy , you can use whoever you want" He said it like 2-3 times. Then he said " Here’s my card call me if you need anything". Then after he left. So after 10 minutes I left and then the other roofer called him 30 minutes later and continued to sell to him over the phone, I found out the next day. Of course probably saying whatever he could to get him not to use us.

Well the homeowner went with that company stating " well the insurance company sent him so they must want us to use them right?" …we’ll of course I said no thats not the case. They are overlaoded because of Irene and their job is to show up and simple inspect. He said well sorry I already gave them check, etc.

First of all I’m glad my professionalism kept me from going all “old school roofer” on that douche bag, infront of the homeowner. lol!.. Ten years ago I may not have been so cool…

How do you guys handle something like this???..Isnt it the other roofers job to just show up, inspect and maybe at most hand him a card??

I appriciate any thoughts or insight on this …

Thanks!!!

Scott

It happened once to me, sent out a Preferred Contractor and he agreed with my scope, mostly.

The important thing to concrete in the HO’s mind is you work for THEM not the Insurance Company. Translated, you need to do a great job for them to use them for referrals and references- the Insurance Company will only keep the Preferred as long as they are keeping costs down-

In my experience the add-ons/ supplements that should be paid by Insurer- will be paid by Policyholder. This vicious circle is keeping the Preferred making money, saving the IC money and ultimately costing the HO.

If you are sporting Xactimate then have the Estimate complete and get a signature along with the check for Deductible. If they cannot afford/ want to pay the deductible you should move along to the next one they are not your buyer.

My first order of business would have been a signed contingency prior to the inspection by who ever they send…That would have blocked anyone from flipping your homeowner.That line of b.s the homeowner gave you about a preferred contractor is just that.,B.S!!!.,they might have covered a deductible or gave them some free upgrades.

That contingency will eliminate alot of that crap.But a contingency opens up alot of other issues itself.Once you left that customer you lost him.You should always have them sign prior to the adjuster’s meeting.

The homeowner has the right to pick who ever they choose.The adjusters are not suppose to influence the insured in any selection process.I am a preferred contractor and it is explained up front that they use me (Insurer)as a vendor but it’s ultimately the insureds decision.But I rarely face your scenario because a contingency is first on my list.

It sucks but I feel the other contractor read your inexperience and monopolized off it.

They are all happy go lucky.,lubby dubby until they receive that summary or figure out a way to better themselves at your expense.

The key is having a contract. If a contract were signed and in your possession, when the Preferred Contractor made the statement about them choosing whomever they wanted, you could have stepped in and informed the guy that you had a contract and he was stepping over the line and on the verge of tortuous contractual interference. As an after thought, you could have potentially anticipated what was going to occur and been in contact with your Customer, setting their expectations and cementing your contract.

Lesson learned. This will happen from time to time. It isn’t just a matter of preventing this from happening, it is simply good business to have essentially locked the Customer up regardless. It could be another contractor coming by offering to pay their deductible or any number of scenarios. If you don’t lock the Customer up with a contract AND great salesmanship, don’t be surprised when you lose a few.

all three replies appreciated and very helpful…I agree I do need to start getting contigency contracts signed more often.

I have 15+ years of sales exp. and a marketing degree so I do have tons of sales exp. and it usually serves me very well…But again, the residential insurance claims are bit unchartered territory for me. …

but I agree I do need to get a signature at first meeting. I know a lot of guys that get one before they even climb on the roof and inspcet it.

So it sounds like basically getting one signed lessens the change of them turning on you or going to the preferred contractor , but they still turn occassionally?

So roofmaster?..the insurance company that sends you on inspections, do they tell you just to inspect it and leave or are you allowed to sell it agressively and not sell it if their is a contigency between the insured and the original contractor/roofer???..how do they tell you to treat it?..aren’t they paying you to just do the inspection and relay it back to them?

If I am called from either the insurer or the insured a contingency is signed.That is before I even set foot on the roof.If I am called after the summary has been issued I have a pretty high closing rate for vendor jobs.

If I am working in a neighborhood that has storm damage. I am approached alot from the neighbors and the people in the area for a storm damage inspection.Before I even put a ladder up I explain my process.More times than not I can have it signed before inspecting.

If I ever have an adjusters meeting that contingency is signed prior.Waiting until the adjusters meeting is setting yourself up.If you wait till the summary is issued then a contingency is out the window.

They see the amount they are getting and their wheels start turning thinking of a way to eliminate you. Then the process of selecting a contractor who will eat the deductible and or put some coin back in their pockets is started.

Its best you have that signed after your company presentation.

I have never taken a job from anyone that was there first.If you were working the claim then I would find it unethical to take something from you that you basically paved the way for.

Ethical or not I would not be able to sell the job if its under a contingency.They can cancel during that 3 day’s or after.,but if their claim was not denied in part or whole then a early termination fee applies.Within reason of course.

Thanks Roofmaster…good info.!!!

During winter/downtime I’m going to work on putting together a good contingency contract to use

Scott

the residential insurance claims are bit unchartered territory for me. …

Nothing to be intimidated by IF your findings are actual damages covered by their Policy.

[quote=“ScottMRoofing”]Thanks Roofmaster…good info.!!!

During winter/downtime I’m going to work on putting together a good contingency contract to use

Scott[/quote]

Take some sound advice from myself and other high volume insurance contractors on this site.Don’t put it together on your own.Have your attorney assist you.It is vital that your language is associated with what is required and what best fits your state.But be prepared to put in some cash.Also periodically have your contingency updated.But keep in mind simple and to the point.

A bulky contingency can create havoc with the homeowners during a sensitive time after a catastrophe or any loss for that matter.Some people are annoyed by an endless stream of paperwork.I know I am.

[quote=“ScottMRoofing”]I agree I do need to start getting contigency contracts signed more often.

All of the time, before doing much of anything else and make sure your new contingency agreement is reviewed and approved by a competent construction attorney - for your state and any other states you plan to work in.

I have 15+ years of sales exp. and a marketing degree so I do have tons of sales exp. and it usually serves me very well…But again, the residential insurance claims are bit unchartered territory for me. …

Helpful…when you can apply that to training specific to ins claims processing. You can either take the next several years (or longer) to learn the process, or, you can choose to get properly trained in the process in a couple of months and earn what you would - maybe - otherwise be earning 2, 3, 5, years down the road with some expereince behind you.

but I agree I do need to get a signature at first meeting. I know a lot of guys that get one before they even climb on the roof and inspcet it.

So it sounds like basically getting one signed lessens the change of them turning on you or going to the preferred contractor , but they still turn occassionally?

Yes and yes

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