"By The Book" roofing VS "Real World Roofing&

How many of you have deviated from the directions and/or
manufacturers specs when applying a roofing system?

There is “by the book” roofing and “real world” roofing.

In the end, the only thing that matters is that the roof is installed right.

And “right” is relative.

Sometimes (gasp!) actual “Roofers” know more about the material
they are installing than the guys in the white lab coats and shirts & ties.

Systems are adapted to local regions with conditions that cannot
be duplicated in a laboratory or on a computer simulation program.

:o Well some I think became coat and tie types because they coulnt make it as real roofer. I know of several cases of this.

As in “Those who can’t do, teach.”

Just wondering, how many of those “sticklers” for the rules have in their own past, deviated from manufacturer specs.

There are certain situations where you HAVE to deviate from manufacturers directions.

In those cases, I just think like a rain drop.

[quote=“BAMBAMM5144”]There are certain situations where you HAVE to deviate from manufacturers directions.

In those cases, I just think like a rain drop.[/quote]

Wonder what the Spec Police would think about that!

LOL

(PS Totally agree with you though.)

So what if you do it by the book?

What type of specs are we talking about deviating from? And why?

You couldnt fit all the different situations in one book IMO so sometimes you do need to think like a raindrop.

Any manufacturer worth their salt should revise their specs if someone on the job has found a better solution. This works when you have quality workmanship.

Unfortunately, especially in hail prone areas the specs need to be written to help fly by night contractors screw it up less than usual :wink:

[quote=“2ndGen”]

[quote=“BAMBAMM5144”]There are certain situations where you HAVE to deviate from manufacturers directions.

In those cases, I just think like a rain drop.[/quote]

Wonder what the Spec Police would think about that!

LOL

(PS Totally agree with you though.)[/quote]

It would depend on the “Spec Police” that you have on site. If you were lucky enough to have someone like me with hands-on roofing background (rare for a consultant), you’ll find that person understands the difference between real world and book. However, that person also probably knows why certain things need to be done, that the roofer doesn’t understand or appreciate. Then again, there is the part about the owner getting what they paid for, and not what the roofer decides they want to put on; and yes that does happen, and yes I do bust people for mopping 3 plies instead of 4, or installing EPDM laps while the glue is still wet, and other little “spec” things like that.

Now, if you are unfortunate and get one of those “book learned consultants,” then you’re going to have a hard time of it.

[quote=“Cerberus”]

It would depend on the “Spec Police” that you have on site. If you were lucky enough to have someone like me with hands-on roofing background (rare for a consultant), you’ll find that person understands the difference between real world and book. [/quote]

“How” hands on?

How many years did you roof before you began to consult for a living?

And while you’re at it, which have you done longer?

Roofing?

Or consulting?

[quote=“2ndGen”]

[quote=“Cerberus”]

It would depend on the “Spec Police” that you have on site. If you were lucky enough to have someone like me with hands-on roofing background (rare for a consultant), you’ll find that person understands the difference between real world and book. [/quote]

“How” hands on?

How many years did you roof before you began to consult for a living?

And while you’re at it, which have you done longer?

Roofing?

Or consulting?[/quote]

10+20=30 yrs

well as a younger generation roofer slowly taking my fathers business over, Im currently in the process of making all our installs as close to “the book” as possible. unfortunately I do not have access WSRCA and NRCA books but luckily for me I am very computer literate and always on the internet. My father is a good quality roofer and has ben licensed since '89 but over time and with his age he has gotten to the “oh it will be fine stage” which doesnt fly with me and often leaves me scratching my head. Of course there will always be situations that must be done the best possible way which may not be defined in the instructions. these are the times where you must think like moisture.

I recently was employed by a roofing company that only performed roofing inspections, and in my 2 month employment I learned quite a bit and saw a lot of poor craftsmanship installs in the roofing industry. This is another reason why Im very fond of following the book as closely as possible.

In addition, i want to be able to stand by my roofs and have the manufacture do the same. Granted they will always find a way to get out of a warranty but id like to make it as hard as possible.

The problem with “the book” is not every detail can be in it. Architects are always trying to design the next best thing. Construction is constantly evolving. IMO, I would rather have a roofer with field knowledge and common sense rather than a “book roofer”. While he was reading the book, the common sense guy was installing roofs. Like a number of others said, if you can be a water drop, you’ll be fine.

2nd Gen, Can you give some examples of when to not roof by the book? Not when either is right, but when it is better not to do it bookie style. Or when the ‘book’ is wrong? I’m a residential roof and I can’t come up with to much off the top of my head.

Ice & Water Shield used in a “tricky” area (like where two dormers meet or are barely a foot or two apart).

If you followed the specs, you’d just do the valleys and around the perimeter of the dormers. In those situations, I’d I&W all the way from in between the dormers up to the ridge. With the snow & ice we get around here, a set-up like that is crying for a leak eventually.

Becoming creative with the material and using it in a way never described or anticipated by the guys in the white lab coats and the Certifications because only “you” know what’s going on up there and you are the one who knows from experience what is happening there or what is going to happen there based upon your regional knowledge (weather, seasons, conditions, etc…). :slight_smile:

And I’m not talking about a well planned out design, but some of these additions where homeowners will have a general contractor install a dormer without even thinking of how it will affect their roof (basically, a scenario unforeseen by manufacturers).

Any situation where a roofer has to be the one who “makes up” the rules where the manufacturer’s application instructions come up lacking or where his idea will result in a better job.