Correct fastening

OK all you never properly trained, piecework paid, in a hurry, Cowboy roofers pay attention : ) The shingle nail must be straight ( up and down ); The nail head must be flush with the shingle surface ( snug on top ); nails must not be over driven ( pushed through ); or angle driven ( tilted ). If a nail is bad put a good one in next to it. Switch to hand nailing until you understand this then go back to the unreliable gun. Class dismissed. I’ve seen countless roofs with 70-80-90% of nails over driven and way above the factory embossed nailing lines. Most of these ended up being torn off and redone. It’s just as easy to put a nail here as it is to put a nail there. I always hand nailed everything including plywood. Better job. Takes longer costs more but homeowners willing to pay for true quality. True story.

Ok. And the point of your post is? Seems like you assume there’s a bunch of jack-leg three chucks in a truck type roofers here on this forum. You are wrong. All of the old hands here know their stuff and give good advice. I’m very curious as to what prompted this post.

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And that’s why you don’t install. EDIT I tried an air nailer 20+ years ago and after 200 SQ between needing a hammer to drive high nails, a tar gun to caulk blow throughs, every coil jamming at some point, blowing breakers with the compressor, and tripping on hoses, I sold the gun. Tried one last year and they HAVE made improvements…

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Sounds like his wife ran off with a cowboy roofer.

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Naw, all roofing laborers need to read this.
Because many are Not paying attention to
A properly installed fastener.
A fastener driven Too deep and/or shot too high above the double thickness area is a common mistake.

Show your laborers exactly where the double-thickness ends and demand they keep it there.

Every fastener that missed the double-thickness, i want tar on top of it.
Because more than likely it was driven too deep

Do my guys want to throw me off the roof?
Yeah, sometimes.
But i pay them considerably
Better than every one else,
So they still smile.

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Ehh… and all you scissor trucks get out of here. It’s better to pack it up the ladder. Progress isn’t always good but just supervise your crews better and everything will be ok.

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I agree about what’s said about improperly driven nails because most every roof has the issue. It can potentially cost a homeowner there warranty if it’s improperly installed, however instead of jumping straight to hand nailing I little understanding of how the equipment works, and observation during install can limit this problem. Pressures change and need adjusted. Simple as that but at the end of the day this needs taught on the job and not a message forum. Those roofers doing this will never install properly if not properly trained.

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I threw a couple guys off a roof in Georgia and had to buy a laddervator, cause nobody would work with me. Still have it 30+ years later.

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When I was first breaking in, 1985, my boss had a scissor bed but wouldn’t even cross a sidewalk with it. Have the kids load it up the ladder, never flat on the shoulder bundles on edge to keep them from getting flimsy. Hand nail, 6 nail everything. Not allowed to drop scraps or wrappers off roof, had to reverse pack trash down the ladder. That doesn’t even cover our hot tar rules, no chopping plugs for the kettle load 100 pounders, hot up ladders in buckets when stinger wouldn’t reach etc. Ahh…good times.

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