Drip Edging (What kind to use?)

I have a house with a hip roof where I plan to put new sheathing and architectural shingles on the roof.
The bottom edge of the sheathing at the eaves will be even with the outside edge of the facia. What kind of drip edging is generally used. I do not plan on having any gutters for the near future. Also, when the drip edge is installed is it placed snug against the deck and facia or do I need to offset the drip edge so it doesn’t come in contact with the facia. I was watching a video on “This Old House” where the drip edge was set 3/8" away from the deck and facia. I don’t know if this is standard practice or something particular to an area or maybe just a contractors different approach. Any input would be appreciated.

We normally use a “t-drip”, it’s also called “D” for some reason also.
The top of the t-drip is installed to run with the plane of the roof.
The face of the t-drip is snug against the facia, not so tight so as to distort the metal.
There shouldn’t be a gap, the wind will catch it and it will rattle and eventually get bent.

And don’t forget, install the drip-edge on top of the underlayment along the rakes, but beneath the underlayment along the fascia board. I’d also look into using some I&WS along the roof perimeter if you aren’t going to use gutters, and you may even want to go to a roofing & sheet-metal shop and have them shop form you some drip-edge with dimensions of your choosing.

I prefer to install the drip edge not hard up against the fascia board. I see rotted out fascia and eaves all the time when aluminum fascia is installed and the drip edge is tight up against the fascia.

The best technique (IMO) is to let the decking extend past the fascia board approximately 3/4" then install a 1" x 2" on the fascia board up against the underside of the decking. Then install drip edge that has a 2 1/2" face. This way when water drips from the drip edge is doesn’t “crawl” down the fascia.

In some areas they refer to the 1â€Â

if you dont want the face of the drip edge touchin the
fasha then install a 1"x2" furing strip at top of fasha first.
and i like my edge metal on top of underlayment,and then tared.
sorry cerb

gweedo

If you will never have gutters you might want to put the metal tight ,but if you may put gutters on at some point, you’ll want any moisture that gets on the metal to drip into the gutter. So if you may at some point put gutters on we always put it to where your finger can go between the metal and the facia board. We use a 1"x3" on a 5/12 bend, 1" in the gutter and 3" on the roof.

You guys are killin’ me! :expressionless:

gweedo, 1st rate, wrdesign, it is spelled fascia; I’ll cut you some slack on furring strip gweedo. :wink:

roofrite, it is spelled frieze board, but at least you got fascia right. :smiley:

Here guys, and I mean that in the nicest way; seriously:

diversifiedroofingllc.com/im … =published

My intent is not to be the spelling police, so don’t take this personal and get all hurt. :mrgreen:

[quote=“gweedo”]if you dont want the face of the drip edge touchin the
fasha then install a 1"x2" furing strip at top of fasha first.
and i like my edge metal on top of underlayment,and then tared.
sorry cerb

gweedo[/quote]

So you run you felt under the flange on your drip-edge (wrong, except where required by local codes as noted in video), but then seal the flange and underlayment with roofing mastic? If you are doing that and any water that runs down the underlayment can’t get beneath the flange, then you are fine in my opinion. I wouldn’t do it that way, and that is not the recommended way to do it, but if you create a seal it should work.

gaf.com/How-To-Video-Library … p-Edge.asp

And if you are deaf, you can just follow along by watching the guy’s hands. :mrgreen:

Gweedo knows the correct way to do it.
And it is the very best way…

Yes, we may get our fingers dirty.
but real men dont mind that.

ps. dont have a heart attack.:slight_smile:

I will have to put my vote with Cerberus on this one. All this talk of fascia and furring strips is killing me though.
P.S. spellcheck only takes 2 seconds. Not to be a dick but improper spelling kills me.

Most of you guys must be from the south. All of the things I just read are not done around here lol. 95% of our house have metal fascia so our d-edge is snug to it not tight, this will cause metal to bend. If gutters are an option in the future use gutter apron. This is just an L form and allows gutters to be put behind it no matter how tight you install it. The reason for your T-edging is sometimes called D-edge is because the D stands for drip and the T stands for the shape. Unless you need a custom d-edge, I would just buy standard, custom from a shop will be a wasted cost.
I just explained how we apply our underlayment here in MN in the underlayment topic. Your ways are much diff then ours. Hope I used the proper spelling, I noticed my 5th grade english teacher maybe on this forum LOL!

[quote=“roof-lover”]Gweedo knows the correct way to do it.
And it is the very best way…

Yes, we may get our fingers dirty.
but real men dont mind that.

ps. dont have a heart attack.:)[/quote]

Eh, I prefer I&WS along the perimeters (it is code where I’m from), so the roofing cement is not needed and the felt should be installed over the drip edge at the eaves like the manf. recommends. :mrgreen:

And don’t worry, I won’t have a heart-attack and I would even accept your way on one of my jobs if it passed my visual inspection. Although, I would have to note that it was not done per industry standards, and does not comply with the manufacturer’s recommendations. :o

[quote=“wb exteriors”]Most of you guys must be from the south. All of the things I just read are not done around here lol. 95% of our house have metal fascia so our d-edge is snug to it not tight, this will cause metal to bend. If gutters are an option in the future use gutter apron. This is just an L form and allows gutters to be put behind it no matter how tight you install it. The reason for your T-edging is sometimes called D-edge is because the D stands for drip and the T stands for the shape. Unless you need a custom d-edge, I would just buy standard, custom from a shop will be a wasted cost.
I just explained how we apply our underlayment here in MN in the underlayment topic. Your ways are much diff then ours. Hope I used the proper spelling, I noticed my 5th grade english teacher maybe on this forum LOL![/quote]

I don’t know about your English teacher, but there certainly is a smart-ass patrolling the board! 8)

BTW, you always capitalize “E” in English :smiley:

Oh, and I went back and looked at your other post and it sounds like we do it pretty much the same other than I run my I&WS over the roof deck and down the fascia board, then install my drip, then install underlayment over top the drip (at eaves), and extend shingles 1/2 - 3/4 past edge of drip. If using T-style drip, then I tend to run the shingles about 1/4 - 1/2 inch past the edge of drip.

Then again, I don’t really roof any more. In fact, I can pretty much tell you the next roof I put on will be my own in a few years. :mrgreen: