Easy to lift shingles?

So, i was up on my recently replaced roof because i just like to hang out up there…No, actuallly, just checking some repaired low nails.

Anyway, i noticed that many of the shingle’s front edge, or leading edge maybe it’s called, could easily be lifted up. Many were “stuck down” but a lot could be lifted with finger pressure. Is this normal?

R&R was done on November 11, I’m in west texas so we’ve had several days of 75+ weather since then, shingles were GAF 30Y.

What do you think?
Marshall

hey marshallv.
we have a member here called marshall exteriors.

yeah your just gonna have to wait for the 90 degree
days. it will all eventually lay down and stick.

give it time be patient.

gweedo.

Give them some time they will seal

[quote=“marshallv”]So, i was up on my recently replaced roof because i just like to hang out up there…No, actuallly, just checking some repaired low nails.

Anyway, i noticed that many of the shingle’s front edge, or leading edge maybe it’s called, could easily be lifted up. Many were “stuck down” but a lot could be lifted with finger pressure. Is this normal?

R&R was done on November 11, I’m in west texas so we’ve had several days of 75+ weather since then, shingles were GAF 30Y.

What do you think?
Marshall[/quote]

I am not sure what was done on your roof, but you mention replaced and repaired. If your roof was repaired after installation, and shingles were pulled up that had been previously sealed down, they will need to be re-glued.

The “tar strip” makes a chemical reaction that cannot occur twice. If it is just the original shingle not getting enough heat, then it will still seal.

Since the tar strip is on the top of the shingle below, the repaired shingle cannot seal again. I see this mistake made in repairs constantly.

It is good to see a homeowner keeping an eye on his roof.

good stuff gary.
stick around.

gweedo

Gary,
That makes sense. However, these are new shingles put down about 60 days ago. Again, some are stuck good, some are not.

The only thing that concerns me is where i live, it’s guaranteed we will get some 40MPH gusty days prior to the next 90+ deg day.

I guess sitting back and waiting is still the way to go. Thanks alot for all the input.

[quote=“Gary”]

Since the tar strip is on the top of the shingle below, the repaired shingle cannot seal again. I see this mistake made in repairs constantly.[/quote]

Do you mean on a brand new shingle, the tar strip is on the top?
Because the GAF Timberline 30 I’m installing have the tar strip on the bottom of the shingle. Maybe they differ between regions.

[quote=“bcdemon”]

Since the tar strip is on the top of the shingle below, the repaired shingle cannot seal again. I see this mistake made in repairs constantly.

Do you mean on a brand new shingle, the tar strip is on the top?
Because the GAF Timberline 30 I’m installing have the tar strip on the bottom of the shingle. Maybe they differ between regions.[/quote]

We actually have both around here right now. Just this past year we switched to the new metric GAFs, seal strip on bottom. They have them at home depot. However, if I order GAFs from Best, they come out english dimension with sealant on top.

The old english dimension ones are better. The new ones are so lightweight it frightens me.

Marshallv;

I imagine your unsealed shingles are on the north side away from the sun.

I doubt if a 40 mph wind will hurt you. We got a 53 mph wind here days after we installed five roofs, and there was zero problem.

Your roofer should be on the hook if he cold installs shingles, in my opinion anyway. If we take the chance to install in cold weather, we bear the responsibility if something goes wrong. Now, that does not count damage over the manufacturer’s warranty, like a tornado.