HELP. Question of where nails should be placed

Homeowner here so please excuse me for how I try to describe this.

I got on the ladder and looked up the roofer so I can see the edges of the shingles at eye level. What I see are several instances where the nail on one shingle is lined up with the edge of the next shingle above it.

How is the GAF High Def nail line set up?

Should the nail line on one shingle be the starting point of the next shingle?

If not how far should the next shingle “hang down” over this nail line?

In other words should I be able to see any nails what so ever?

I have yet to pay for the job. How should I approach this?

Pics would help,but from what I get from your explanation it is done wrong. hammerzone.com/archives/roof … halt_1.htm Here is an idea of installation.I have not read this whole article,but should be fairly accurate.

Even better wonderhowto.com/how-to-prope … of-347656/

The nail line on GAF Timberline isn’t too far from the exposure line, like maybe 1/2 inch at the most.
So if your roof hasn’t completely sealed down yet, and you get up on a ladder so you can see under the shingles, then yes you would see nails. Now if you can stand on your roof and STILL see nails, then you have an issue.

This is why I do like the Certainteed and Malarky nail lines. It is about an inch wide, giving the installers lots of room to nail.

You should be able to go to any of the manufactures websites to see shingle application details. Here is a link for GAF 30yr.
gaf.com/Roofing/Residential/ … 335-v1.pdf

[quote=“bcdemon”]The nail line on GAF Timberline isn’t too far from the exposure line, like maybe 1/2 inch at the most.
So if your roof hasn’t completely sealed down yet, and you get up on a ladder so you can see under the shingles, then yes you would see nails. Now if you can stand on your roof and STILL see nails, then you have an issue.

This is why I do like the Certainteed and Malarky nail lines. It is about an inch wide, giving the installers lots of room to nail.[/quote]

All true.
“1/2 inch at the most” is a very accurate statement since it is not even that. The double thickness(true nail line) ends 3/4 of an inch above the exposure on some timberlines.

I say the lower the better, as long as they’re not exposed.

We nail through the double thickness. As far as I am concerned CT prints the 1" nail line for high production hacks.

CT knows that the shingle will not blow-off or fall apart within 5 yrs of it sealing. I know that they are fair game after that wind warranty period which is - VOILA!- 5 years!!

[quote=“Gus Jones”]We nail through the double thickness. As far as I am concerned CT prints the 1" nail line for high production hacks.

CT knows that the shingle will not blow-off or fall apart within 5 yrs of it sealing. I know that they are fair game after that wind warranty period which is - VOILA!- 5 years!![/quote]

I agree whole heartedly

[quote=“Gus Jones”]We nail through the double thickness. As far as I am concerned CT prints the 1" nail line for high production hacks.

CT knows that the shingle will not blow-off or fall apart within 5 yrs of it sealing. I know that they are fair game after that wind warranty period which is - VOILA!- 5 years!![/quote]

Ditto.