Hip Roof Shingle Course Pattern

Hey guys,

I will be putting a new roof on my house this year. I have a 4 hip / 1 ridge roof for both my home and detached garage.

Any opinions on a shigle course pattern? I have seen one where you start with a full shingle on the first course, then a half shingle on the second, and then back to a full on the third.

I have also read a full first course, take off six inches for the second course, and take off twelve for the third.

I’ve never shingled with archs, only tabbers. Everybody says its easier with archs.

Thanks for your replies.

Read the back of the bundle you buy, it will tell you how much to cut off from each shingle. And if you follow the manufacturers installation instructions then you preserve the manufacturers warranty.

Just follow the instructions that are printed on the package and you will be fine.
Don’t start thinking too hard making more of it than it is.

I tend to split hairs… Thanks guys

When I do hips I start in the lower left corner with a full shingle. Then I cut 12" off the next, use the remaining 24" for the second course then the 12" for the third course then I will start over with a full shingle on the bottom.

I have found this way to use the least amount of shingles as possible. Nothing gets me more heated when I see a 30" shingle thrown in the dumpster.

[quote=“BAMBAMM5144”]When I do hips I start in the lower left corner with a full shingle. Then I cut 12" off the next, use the remaining 24" for the second course then the 12" for the third course then I will start over with a full shingle on the bottom.

I have found this way to use the least amount of shingles as possible. Nothing gets me more heated when I see a 30" shingle thrown in the dumpster.[/quote]

When we do hips we use 1/2 length shingles for spacers to keep the seams away from the hips and it helps to minimize waste.
Using this method we don’t get much waste that is more than 10"-12" of usable shingle, many of these get used in valleys, or for spacers on rake edges.
This method also helps in keeping the pattern correct so that the laminates don’t start stacking up.