Hot Attic and new Roof

I need a new roof. I have had two roofers come out and tell me this. While I am having a new roof installed (new plywood, shingles etc) I would like to see if they can do something about the high temperatures/heat in my attic.

My house is three stories, approximately 60 x 25 ft each floor with a gabbled roof. Basement floor is underground and is always very cool. I had my attic spray foamed with 16 inches of closed cell cellulose blown in and that helpded but not good enough. I also had an attic ladder tent installed. Main level stays cool with AC on, but the second/top floor is always much hotter (5-10 degress hotter).

When i go into the attic is a sauna… My guess is that while it is 90 degrees out in the middle of the day, the attic is 125-135 degrees.

Because I need a new roof, I figured I would have them vent and install devices to get the temp down. My queston is what can I do?

Should I have a ridge vent put in? If so how will that affect attic fan? Should have some kind of radiant barrier installed? More vents?

Wow, you have so much going on my eyes hurt. If the attic is occupied you will have to hang batt insulation directly to the roof area. Insulation blown into the attic floor won’t help your attic. If it is unoccupied, the addition of a ridge vent combined with eave vents will greatly help to keep the hot air moving out of the attic area and will help the insulation keep heat out of your house. An attic fan (as opposed to a whole house fan) will short circuit the ridge vent if you keep it. Keep in mind that fans are effective in a relatively small area near the fan.

I am sorry if I gave you too much info. I just wanted some informed advice.

The attic is completely empty right now and will be empty after the roof is replaced. Based on your assessment above it sounds like I should get rid of the attic fan and have a ridge vent installed. Correct?

Besides a ridge vent, should I also have any other venting installed. Right now I have an attic fan and one other air vent… that is it.

I do not mind spending some extra money now to increase the comfort of the house (mostly upstairs). Any thing else you or someone else can recomend?

[quote=“stepmback”]

Do you have a separate HVAC unit for the upstairs with its own thermostat? If not, then it is likely that the thermostat for the HVAC is located downstairs. If this is the case then the upstairs will always be warmer than the downstairs in the summer. A solution is to install a zone system that allows your existing HVAC equipment to service both areas separately. Each area would have its own thermostat and demand heat or cooling for the separate areas.

[quote=“ChrisCole”]

[quote=“stepmback”]

Do you have a separate HVAC unit for the upstairs with its own thermostat? If not, then it is likely that the thermostat for the HVAC is located downstairs. If this is the case then the upstairs will always be warmer than the downstairs in the summer. A solution is to install a zone system that allows your existing HVAC equipment to service both areas separately. Each area would have its own thermostat and demand heat or cooling for the separate areas.[/quote]

The thermostat is already upstairs which is why the main floor is so much cooler. We do not have a seperate HVAC for upstairs, but I will be in the market next year or two years out for a new HVAC so I may explore a seperate system then.

A good contractor would be able to help you. Last year I got Champion window to install my roof. They did a good job venting my roof. Get them to come for an estimate and find out exactly what they would do. Ask your other contractors for an estimate for the same and warranties.

Better attic venting will help some and you certainly want to correct that, but based on my 30 years of experience, the only true solution will be a seperate hvac unit for the upstairs.

the best thing to do (and i am an expert on ventilation) is make sure all gable end,power vents,turtle vents ect. are closed off. make sure you have opened soffit vents all the way around your house under the eave…make sure your ridge vent is cut properly and open. tack up radiant barrier in the attic on the rafters. that will help heat coming into the attic.

LOL we all are.

Welcome aboard.

ROFL :lol:

The most popular roof mounted ventilation of the modern era is the beloved ridge vent.

Personally, I like the fact that fans physically pull the hot air out of the attic without depending on it to rise out on its on.

However I do not like the cheap fans. 90% of all fans installed on roofs are the cheapest thing available. They are 5 yr fan motors that move 1170 cubic feet per minute of air.

When I replace fans for people I use the 10 yr fans that move 1600 cfm. They cost a whole $65 more than the cheap ones and all you get is double the warranty and over 25% more air moved.