How do you get ripped up shingles into the dumpster?

I just started stripping the roof and would like to know how to move the ripped up shingles and nails into the dumpster? Picking them up by hand is tough and very slow. A big scoop shovel is slightly better.

Any suggestions?

Thanks.

Day laborers !

[quote=“rogersmithiii”]I just started stripping the roof and would like to know how to move the ripped up shingles and nails into the dumpster? Picking them up by hand is tough and very slow. A big scoop shovel is slightly better.

Any suggestions?

Thanks.[/quote]

Lay tarps below and to the side of what you are removing.

Take a little more time during the tear off part and take the shingles off (not necessarily 1 at a time but keep them in one piece as much as you can) and stack them as you go.

Pull all the nails as you tear off the shingles.

Think a little before you get started, it helps.

[quote=“-Axiom-”]

[quote=“rogersmithiii”]I just started stripping the roof and would like to know how to move the ripped up shingles and nails into the dumpster? Picking them up by hand is tough and very slow. A big scoop shovel is slightly better.

Any suggestions?

Thanks.[/quote]

Lay tarps below and to the side of what you are removing.

Take a little more time during the tear off part and take the shingles off (not necessarily 1 at a time but keep them in one piece as much as you can) and stack them as you go.

Pull all the nails as you tear off the shingles.

Think a little before you get started, it helps.[/quote]

This is it. figure out how big a stack you can throw and make the stacks that size.

Do you guys pry facing the ridge or the eaves?

Downhill.

Downhill. Spade in right hand, stack with the left. Popping every nail as I go. Loose stuff gets deep, I take a moment and sweep it up and into a 3 gal bucket. (They don’t tip over on slopes.)
I pick up the stacks and toss them into the dumpster. I get little or no trash on the tarp I spead on the ground before starting. I have no intention of moving the trash more than once.

Another tip. If I’m cutting a ridge vent in, I cut as soon as the cap and top courses are off. The sawdust goes down the roof with the trash and there’s no clean up. A huge storm caught us once and I learned another thing. Since then, I leave the wood from the cut in until the roof is done and I’m ready for the RV. Plugging a 4" x 60’ hole in the roof during a torrential downpour is a good teacher.

There are many different ways to remove the shingles from a roof. The best way will depend on multiple factors and every job is unique unto itself. Only an advanced experience roofer understands this. Guys that use the same tool in the same way on every job don’t even realize how hard they are making things on themselves.

The number of layers and type of wood decking that the shingles are installed to are probably the number 1 factors, followed by the type and condition of the shingles and the length of the nails. Another huge factor is the temperature at the time the work is being performed.

The above factors determine the best tool to use for removal. Spade shovels, Pitch Forks, Shingle eaters with the teeth and by hand. I even know some guys that use claw hammers with good success but that’s a specialty.

Just remember when tearing off that if you make a big mess, then you’ve got a big mess to clean up.

Do you guys pry facing the ridge or the eaves?

Thank God I haven’t had to do a full tear in a long time but when I did…

It depends. Generally old brittle shingles tear better from the top, newer stuff you can attack from the bottom and peel off big patches at a time.
Also depends on how my back was feeling, lol.

For the shingle pieces? Use a BA garbage bucket or wheel barrow if needed. Best to be like the Egyptians and just throw man power at it; ripping
is grunt work, not science.
globalindustrial.com/p/janit … -55-gallon