How to insulate this roof?

I bought an older home built in the 30’s. At some point the attic was remodeled into a master bed/bath. Problem is, the drywall is attached to the studs holding up the roof, so there is no “attic space” to keep the roof from heating up.

How do i keep the roof insulated from the heat in the master bedroom? I know the studs will couple the heat from inside to out. So i was wondering how to decouple them?

Would tearing down the drywall and putting up SIP’s (Structural Insulated Panels) fix this issue? Is there another way to do it?

Also, the roof is original for the house. Its made of stone slates. I was told it was a “lifetime” roof that never needed to be replaced. It doesn’t leak, but it seems expensive to repair and maintain. Is there any reason why we shouldn’t replace it with a modern roof?

what do you mean “modern roof”?Shingles?Slate roof is the most secure investment in your home.

I think you need to do a bit more investigating. You have what is called a cathedral ceiling. The problem here is not a lack of attic space, but a possible lack of ventilation (I say possible because I don’t know if your roof have soffits, ridge vent, or gable vents)

Ideally your roof should be made up like this: Drywall and vapour barrier attached to trusses, insulation between the trusses, 2" or so airspace, roof board attached to trusses, slate tile roofing. This airspace allows air to flow from the soffit vent at the bottom to the ridge or gable vent at the top.

For the love of god, don’t replace things because they are not “modern”. You’ll lose a lot of your old house character, and you won’t necessarily get a better product. In this case, Slate roofing when looked after properly will last a long time.

I did a roof for a guy once that previously had a slate roof removed.
I asked him why and he said because people kept stopping and looking at it…

Keep your slate roof, it’s the best roof you can get for a pitched roof.

Why on Earth would anyone want to replace a slate roof that is in good repair? I would love to have a slate roof, I just can’t afford one. You’d be wise to leave it be, you simply cannot get a more durable residential roof. That will last upwards of 75 years, no joke.

As for keeping the roof from heating up; why? Is there some issue that causes you to feel the need to do so? It seems to me that if it ain’t broke you don’t fix it. Unless you’re having issues with your roof, fix nothing. If you are having mold or ice dam issues, that’s a problem that needs to be fixed. If you just think it needs to be fixed, that’s not a problem and doesn’t need to be fixed.

It should be a crime to tear off a slate roof. find a good slate roofer that can help you maintain it if need be. Check there references, there are many fake slaters out there that overcharge and do bad work.

[quote=“WarGoddess”]Why on Earth would anyone want to replace a slate roof that is in good repair? I would love to have a slate roof, I just can’t afford one. You’d be wise to leave it be, you simply cannot get a more durable residential roof. That will last upwards of 75 years, no joke.

As for keeping the roof from heating up; why? Is there some issue that causes you to feel the need to do so? It seems to me that if it ain’t broke you don’t fix it. Unless you’re having issues with your roof, fix nothing. If you are having mold or ice dam issues, that’s a problem that needs to be fixed. If you just think it needs to be fixed, that’s not a problem and doesn’t need to be fixed.[/quote]

It was put up in 39’, so it’s 71 years old. So do i replace it in 4 years? Or do i ever replace it? How do you determine that?

Yes there are issues. Mostly Ice Damming in the winter. In the winter the snow does not melt evenly. It melts near the top, and then freezes again once its over the overhang area. We’ve had water damage for at least 1 year since we moved in, and we suspect it’s happened in the past before we bought the property.

Also there are issues with chipped pieces of slate, and flashing and its more expensive to fix the slate roof than one with shingles. With the age of the roof, i thought it might be better to replace rather than fix something I’ll likely replace soon anyhow.

Is there a way to tell if it has the proper ventilation without ripping out walls? As far as i can tell there is no ventilation. Where exactly would the vents be located?

For the age of the roof I would say that it would have either the kind of vents that protrude from the side of the roof or none at all. I would recommend ridge vent coupled with soffit vents. I also love to recommend heating roof coils for the problem spots to keep melt from re-freezing. The heating wires alone my solve all your problems.

I never recommend re-roofing slate, they can be repaired almost indefinitely. If you do decide to re-roof and would rather not use real slate, I recommend the new faux slates. These look exactly like slates, but are far easier to install, cheaper and last as long if not longer. Carlisle makes a very nice faux slate, just be sure that you hire someone who knows how to install slate or at least has a portfolio of faux slate rooves to show you.

You should post pix of your slates so we can see what condition they are in.

You need someone who specializes in slate (NOT an asphalt roofer) come out and inspect it. They will be able to tell you how long it will last and what do to for repairs. Yes that will cost you money, but they have the knowledge. As my fiance says when I try to do my own taxes “You went to school for engineering, they went to school for taxes. You don’t see them trying to build something!” :slight_smile:

The repairs to slate may be pricey, but chances are in the long run you will spend less, as the lifespan of a asphalt roof will be a fraction of the life of a slate roof (and even less considering you seem to have poor ventilation, which can easily cut the life of asphlat in half).

As for being able to tell what kind of ventilation you have, go to google and search for pictures of Gable Vent, Ridge Vent, Soffit Vent, and then go look at your roof to see if you have any of those.