Hundred of nails sticking through the eaves LOOKS BAD!

HELP! I just had my house re roofed and noticed that on the east end of the house their are hundreds of nails protruding through the ply wood on the eave. There are not as many in front or back under the eave. It looks like they used different size nails. I AM A WOMAN AND NEED TO KNOW IF THIS NORMAL? IT LOOKS REALLY BAD. THANKS FOR ANY SUGGESTIONS Cheryl

A home with exposed eaves normally has a beadboard or similar type of wood on the exposed portion, if this is the case and nails are poking through your roofer needs to fix this for you.

You say the nails are sticking through the plywood, if this is the case you are supposed to have a soffit installed that covers the underside of the roof deck.
This would not be the roofers fault.

Pictures would help a lot, upload them to your album.

In my opinion it is just part of being a “professional” roofing salesman or contractor to know the things that can easily lead to problems and prevent them from happening before hand.

Same goes for the roofers. Unfortunately these days, the majority of the people in these positions lack experience and things like this are the direct result.

It takes two missed opportunities for this to happen. First the guy that evaluated the roof could have stopped it and then the roofers.

Any roofer, salesman or roofing contractor should know that exposed overhangs should not have nails sticking through them and it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to determine if they will come through.

They can take the shingles off that are over the edge you mentioned, pull all the nails out and re-roof it with a smaller nail or the nails can be cut off from underneath.

Or as Axiom mentioned, you can have soffit wood installed from underneath to cover it but that probably won’t be a good option if your house is older with a designer exposed overhang.

Depends on the roofing company you hired. If you used a reputable roofing company in your town they will make it right. If you hired someone who is not reputable and gave you a low bid I would not pay them anymore money . Take pictures of the work they did and hire another reputable roofing company to come out and see what needs to be done to make it right.

[quote=“LuckyChucky”]In my opinion it is just part of being a “professional” roofing salesman or contractor to know the things that can easily lead to problems and prevent them from happening before hand.

Same goes for the roofers. Unfortunately these days, the majority of the people in these positions lack experience and things like this are the direct result.

It takes two missed opportunities for this to happen. First the guy that evaluated the roof could have stopped it and then the roofers.

[/quote]

This. We screwed up on an older home like this. Our Manager was whining a bit about the situation. I told him the Sales Rep screwed up, the Project Manager screwed up and the roof crew screwed up. 3 freaking people missed something so obvious. I told him to fix it and accept accountability for the mistake as it certainly wasn’t the Customer’s fault.

Yeah, nobody is perfect and mistakes are gonna happen sometimes but the amount of mistakes can be held to a minimum with a little effort.

Of all the review’s I have on Angie’s List there are two where there was a leak after the work was completed. However, both of those clients still gave me an A rated review.

What is of extreme importance to your reputation, is not whether you made a mistake or not but what you did after that fact.

The salesman should have caught this & educated you that this would happen if this is actually plywood. If its 3/4 inch boards then they should have used shorter nails. If it is plywood then cover the soffit.

Im a do it yourselfer, with basically the same problem,
The instructions for nailing my shingles say, “All fasteners must penetrate at least 3/4” into the wood
deck or completely through plywood sheathing"
Assuming your shingles have the same instructions that means you need to find out how thick are the boards that the shingles are nailed into.
Apparently if they are 3/4 of an inch thick the problem could be solved by the roofers pulling up the nails and putting in shorter nails that don’t stick through.

If you have plywood boards that are less than 3/4 inch like I do, then the nails have to stick through as per instructions or the warranty will be void.

You said they seemed to have used different length nails in different sections, that means on one section they could have used shorter nails that void the manufacturers warranty and on the other
they used longer ones that look bad sticking out.
If the boards are the plywood less that 3/4" then you were probably screwed before you started
unless the professionals on here know of some shingles with different instructions.
You could have soffit boards installed under the eaves to cover up the nails but that’s going to cost you and you may not like the way it looks on your style of house.