IB Roofing vs. Fibertite vs. Versico?

Soooo, looking at getting into a PVC type system and trying to choose here. I’ve heard many a good thing about IB Roofing and like their website, however…we are a high end residential shop and don’t do a ton of commercial work. The issue with IB is logistical because they don’t move through
a supplier but deal direct with the roofer, which makes it difficult to get materials to the jobsite and on the roof because it’s delivered by FedEx. At the same time it’s woefully inefficient if you run out of accessories mid-job and new to have them FedEx’d…I see where you could fore go this annoyance by stocking surplus accessories but as I said, we don’t do a ton of commercial work. I’d like to try this system but at this point unless someone can enlighten me to something I’m unaware of it sounds like a logistics nightmare. Just for the record I talked to IB customer service and although he was good at answering my questions he just stated that they had been conducting business this way for a great number of years and it’s worked for them so far, when I mentioned the logistics issue.

Our local supplier deals in FiberTite or Versico, which I have little working knowledge of. Just wondering what PVC systems you low slope guys prefer and why.

That’s an easy one… use Versico PVC. Local distributors stock the product and the plant is much closer to you. It’s also cheaper.

Versico PVC is currently manufactured by Flex. Though last year, if I recall correctly, Carlisle (Versico parent company) announced the construction of a PVC manufacturing plant. Someone correct me if I am wrong on that. I am interested in seeing their new product and honestly will likely stay away for a few years and let someone else be the guinea pig of it.

Having said that, I have no experience with Fibertite, but have installed several IB and many VersiFlex jobs. I think the IB welds a little better, but the VersiFlex isn’t bad at all. The IB feels a little better softer to the touch, but not sure if that makes a difference in the longevitiy of the roof. The VersiFlex was easier for me to get, as DonL said, because of their distribution network and was alot alot cheaper. However I came to find out that IB was raping me bad on prices. Since I closed my company and came to work for my current employer, and see what they are paying for IB, it is right in line with what I was paying for VersiFlex. I personally prefer the VersiFlex when all factors are considered.

If you are doing residential, your only choice is IB because of their residential warranties. Most commercial manufacturers don’t want to touch residential. But keep in mind if you don’t have a shop, the IB needs to be sent somewhere. It ships out of TX. Logistically IB will take more effort, unless you plan to stock it in your shop/warehouse.

I was told that the Versico is a sub division of Carlisle but didn’t bother to confirm that… The PVC system would be exclusively for commercial work, particularly where EPDM is not viable (restaurants, etc.) so residential warranties are a non-issue in this case. System integrity/longevity, logistics and ease of dealing with company reps are key considerations.

Being a certified contractor for both IB and Duro-Last, I would have to pick Duro-Last. IB out of Irving, Texas acts as if they are doing you a favor if they do business with you. Good products, but the service could be more professional, and personable.

Versico now has its own PVC and does not use Flex. The new PVC plant is up and running. For your type of work, I would recommend that you look into WeatherBond material. It is the same quality product as Versico, but the line is aimed at residential and small commercial work. Offers 5-20 year residential/small commercial material warranties as well as a Lifetime material warranty. It is sold by stocking local residential roofing distributors. Prices are very competitive.

To clarify the synergy between Carlisle and Versico, both are part of Carlisle Construction Material (as is WeatherBond). They each seek different segments of the roofing market and offer somewhat different systems. They are each highly competitive with each other and have different applicators (mostly). Management is different for each. All the material they sell comes from the same plants.

[quote=“donl”]Versico now has its own PVC and does not use Flex. The new PVC plant is up and running. For your type of work, I would recommend that you look into WeatherBond material. It is the same quality product as Versico, but the line is aimed at residential and small commercial work. Offers 5-20 year residential/small commercial material warranties as well as a Lifetime material warranty. It is sold by stocking local residential roofing distributors. Prices are very competitive.

To clarify the synergy between Carlisle and Versico, both are part of Carlisle Construction Material (as is WeatherBond). They each seek different segments of the roofing market and offer somewhat different systems. They are each highly competitive with each other and have different applicators (mostly). Management is different for each. All the material they sell comes from the same plants.[/quote]

My experience is that management between Versiso and Carlise is not at all different.

In my market once you get past the Versico sales rep, who is an independent rep marketing all sorts of products, you are dealing strictly with the Carlisle guys. For example, the district manager for Carlise and Versico are the same person. The Technical Advisor for Carlise and Versico are the same person. I couldn’t tell you about the office administrative people, as I haven’t spoken with any of those at Carlisle, but spoke with a couple at Versico.

I am very interested in seeing the new PVC product and looking forward to watching how it performs. My employers are in love with Durolast so not likely at all I will get them to make a change unless something changes with Durolast. I kinda don’t like the Durolast system, not sold on it yet.