Leak question

So it seems that I never had a leak in a downstairs bathroom, and then the roof was replaced and presto a leak in the bathroom. So before I approach my contractor I wanted to ask you guys for your professional opinion on a few things:

  1. It’s pretty apparent that the work is sloppy around the corner, but I wasn’t sure how much of the flashing is part of the responsiblity of the roofer, and how much would go to a different sub-contractor. So after you look at the attached photobucket link I’d like to know what you think.

  2. What appears to be done right and how much was done improperly?

  3. There is one picture where I can see bare wood under the flashing, I have to assume that if this work is done right I should never see bare wood?

  4. What in your opinion needs to be done to seal this up?

Here is a link to photobucket where you can see the pictures:
s1239.photobucket.com/albums/ff517/changetees/

I’m sure I’m going to have follow up questions, but thanks for reading my posting, looking at my pictures and helping me out.

Lloyd

You got hosed. Sloppy, sloppy.

Aren’t these pix the ‘Before’ pix? I hope so. It looks like you need a new roof to me in these photos.

:shock:

Nope, these are the finished roof pix. I’m thinking maybe I need to get a roof inspector to take a look and give me a real assessment of what was done wrong here.
Was there too much done wrong to even list?

Thanks.
Lloyd

Shingles are high nailed and any wind warranty is voided. I know this because the exposures are random and there are no nails in the exposed nail line. Manufacturers will even void other warranty issues when they see that.
Step flashing fully exposed on top of a shingle.
Flashing and counter-flashing are all wrong with nasty gaps in the step flashing.
Different colored shingles in evidence.
I believe the rest of the detail work is going to prove to be worthless. I can only guess at the hidden issues. If their visible workmanship is so shoddy, you shouldn’t have any expectations of any other details being correct.

Thanks, I appreciate the honest assessment, now to get it fixed.

Lloyd

The stucco should have been cut high enough to remove all the older counter flashing. (my part of the country, I would hire someone to do that work). then the roofer installs new roof flashings and counter flashings. (Then call back the stucco guy to put back in what was torn out).

Above is my reccomedation… IMO…, others may have similar or other thoughts.

Why did this happen? IMO…

  1. The contractor/estimator/salesmen did not recognize this issue.
  2. The roofer saw what he was up against, decided not to put out the extra effort to make a bad situation better (for the existing conditions)

I think you are right on all accounts. Thanks again.

i really hate to be the guy to say this, and i could be wrong but looks like a classic case of. . . (LOWEST BID) terrible workmanship. You should go over your contract you signed with him. Im sure theres something that he typed in his scope of work that that he didnt do and maybe you could get some of your money back, but unfortunately most dont have much success in doing this. sorry to say

Luckily, or unluckily, this was part of a larger and poorly executed renovation and I still owe my General Contractor money, so I do have a way to get him to try and fix it.
As a side note, he coincidentally called this AM because he wants his Sheet Metal guy to come by and take a look to see what he needs to fix. There was a lot of sheet metal work done, for the integrated gutters, but this work looks to me like bad roofing work, not bad sheet metal work.

Thanks again guys.

[size=150] Behold the Martenator 5000! [/size]

http://media.giantbomb.com/uploads/0/5480/484258-webpg2aagunner.jpg

*Use with care as misuse may create further leak problems.

Quick update.
So my contractor was out here with his sheet metal guy to cover the wood and make things look nicer and the sheet metal guy discovered that the leak is not coming from the roof (per se), but from the master bath shower pan that is directly above it.
I’m posting a new link here( s1239.photobucket.com/albums/ff5 … er%20Roof/ ), which will explain better, but the shower is right above that spot and you’ll see dark water stains along the old flashing, which is covering up the new flashing (you’ll see that in the photos too). I tested the theory when they were here and sure enough when I turned on the shower it started to trickle out on the roof and into the bathroom wall below.
Here’s the catch. Before this section of roof was redone, and that new flashing was installed under that old flashing there was never a leak in that shower pan. You will see photo evidence of that because I snapped a picture from the day the roofers were installing that section of roof and you’ll see that the old flashing is clean and white.
I don’t know how flashing is installed, but is it possible that when these guys installed the new flashing they pierced the shower pan or a pipe and it is now causing a leak that wasn’t there before?
Thanks for all your answers, they are really helpful in trying to understand this mess.
Lloyd

[quote=“honeybadger”]Quick update.
So my contractor was out here with his sheet metal guy to cover the wood and make things look nicer and the sheet metal guy discovered that the leak is not coming from the roof (per se), but from the master bath shower pan that is directly above it.
I’m posting a new link here( s1239.photobucket.com/albums/ff5 … er%20Roof/ ), which will explain better, but the shower is right above that spot and you’ll see dark water stains along the old flashing, which is covering up the new flashing (you’ll see that in the photos too). I tested the theory when they were here and sure enough when I turned on the shower it started to trickle out on the roof and into the bathroom wall below.
Here’s the catch. Before this section of roof was redone, and that new flashing was installed under that old flashing there was never a leak in that shower pan. You will see photo evidence of that because I snapped a picture from the day the roofers were installing that section of roof and you’ll see that the old flashing is clean and white.
I don’t know how flashing is installed, but is it possible that when these guys installed the new flashing they pierced the shower pan or a pipe and it is now causing a leak that wasn’t there before?
Thanks for all your answers, they are really helpful in trying to understand this mess.
Lloyd[/quote]

If they did, I’d like to see how they did that. It is difficult to tell exactly what is going on with your pictures but I would think they would have had to use some incredibly long nails or really did something stupid that can’t be seen in the pictures to accomplished that. If there were a pipe running that close to a wall, I would think that could be a building code violation and not the responsibility of the roof crew anyway.

[quote=“Authentic_Dad”]

[quote=“honeybadger”]Quick update.
So my contractor was out here with his sheet metal guy to cover the wood and make things look nicer and the sheet metal guy discovered that the leak is not coming from the roof (per se), but from the master bath shower pan that is directly above it.
I’m posting a new link here( s1239.photobucket.com/albums/ff5 … er%20Roof/ ), which will explain better, but the shower is right above that spot and you’ll see dark water stains along the old flashing, which is covering up the new flashing (you’ll see that in the photos too). I tested the theory when they were here and sure enough when I turned on the shower it started to trickle out on the roof and into the bathroom wall below.
Here’s the catch. Before this section of roof was redone, and that new flashing was installed under that old flashing there was never a leak in that shower pan. You will see photo evidence of that because I snapped a picture from the day the roofers were installing that section of roof and you’ll see that the old flashing is clean and white.
I don’t know how flashing is installed, but is it possible that when these guys installed the new flashing they pierced the shower pan or a pipe and it is now causing a leak that wasn’t there before?
Thanks for all your answers, they are really helpful in trying to understand this mess.
Lloyd[/quote]

If they did, I’d like to see how they did that. It is difficult to tell exactly what is going on with your pictures but I would think they would have had to use some incredibly long nails or really did something stupid that can’t be seen in the pictures to accomplished that. If there were a pipe running that close to a wall, I would think that could be a building code violation and not the responsibility of the roof crew anyway.[/quote]

I agree with A D here on this. unless i am mistaken (and it happens) it just is terrible craftsmanship and a bunch of hacks who didnt care to do the job right. i had a problem just today on a small residential 18 square with the roof meeting up with a metal awning. instead of doing the job as the cough cough cheapskate cough cough contarctor wanted me to do, i went out and spent my own money to make sure it was done right with the right sized drip edge and flashing. do like the guy before me said, grab your contract call another roofing company out and have the inspector look at the job they did and show him the contract. he will point out the f ups those guys did better than any of us because we arent up there and poking around. so get it re-estimated and see if they will do you for a reasonable offer. and if so go after the origional contractor because we arent hackers and slobs we are ROOFERS and its little scuz balls like this that tarnish most of our reputations. good luck :slight_smile:

The roof inspector was here yesterday for two hours, he was great. Honest and patient with me as I walked the roof and asked him questions. His repeating refrain was, “If these guys had just taken 10 more minutes they could’ve done all this stuff right. I don’t understand why they don’t take any pride in their work.”
The big problem will be the integral gutter system, which cost me an arm and a leg and I never would’ve done if someone had told me that it’s not a great way to move water away from your house. It’s obvious now, but when they were doing it I had no idea.
I don’t think anything rises to the level of criminal, but it’s certainly a lot of sloppy work and poor judgement.
Thanks again to everyone.
And if you are interested I’ll be more than glad to pass along the roof inspection report.

Lloyd