Polaralum - Radiant barrier

Hello experts, my experience in roofing is 0 (if -100 is not possible) Recently we had some hail storm I need to replace my roof. One roofer offered me to install Polaralum as radient barrier over the deck for a aditional cost of $1600 and according to the roofer I can get the energy tax credit. As per my isurance my roof measures nearly 32SQF and 34SQF(for replacement).

So my questions are

  1. Is it worth the aditional $1600?
  2. Is polaralum eligible for tax credit?
  3. Anybody already used polaralum? and whats your personal opinion?

Thanks in advance,
Paul.

Hi,

Tax credits only apply to the cost of the materials.

Labor is not eligible for the tax credit.

who is this “Asper the roofer”?? :wink:

I mean “AS PER” not ASPER

lol!& your tax credit would be $1500 max.,so your lossing a $100. why polara? do you live in a warm climate? if so,then you might save on your a/c draw on the electric bill in the longrun.

I live in north texas. Polaralum is a syntetic material used instead of felt

I have the same question. I live in the DFW area and am having a new roof put in on Monday June 8 due to hail damage. I have 53 squares on my roof. My roofer offered me Plaralum for $1000 on top of (and in addition to) the sheathing.

I am familiar with under decking radiant barriers and their approximate 10% to 15% energy cost savings. I don’t know what the effects of this application is and whether it is worth it.

Does anyone have any experience with it?

One roofer offered me to install Polaralum as radient barrier over the deck for a additional cost of $1600 and according to the roofer I can get the energy tax credit.

  1. Don’t take the roofer’s word you are going to get a tax credit for this product/improvement. Contact the product manufacturer and have them give you written conformation that the product in question is indeed eligible for a tax credit.

  2. As far as I know the tax credit you would be receiving (if anything) for this type of improvement would be aprox. 30% of the material costs only. Maximum credit from 2009-2010 to total no more than 1,500.

  3. The obvious…Figure your 30% material tax credit and weigh it against what you’d be saving in energy costs…which you said was aprox 10%? Now figure you’re only going to save that 10% during the months when you’re running the air-conditioning…

Probably be better off investing in a solar water heater imo. A bit more investment but the return is better and so is the tax credit, because it’s not affected by the 1,500.00 cap.

[quote=“Tar Monkey”]One roofer offered me to install Polaralum as radient barrier over the deck for a additional cost of $1600 and according to the roofer I can get the energy tax credit.

  1. Don’t take the roofer’s word you are going to get a tax credit for this product/improvement. Contact the product manufacturer and have them give you written conformation that the product in question is indeed eligible for a tax credit.

  2. As far as I know the tax credit you would be receiving (if anything) for this type of improvement would be aprox. 30% of the material costs only. Maximum credit from 2009-2010 to total no more than 1,500.

  3. The obvious…Figure your 30% material tax credit and weigh it against what you’d be saving in energy costs…which you said was aprox 10%? Now figure you’re only going to save that 10% during the months when you’re running the air-conditioning…

Probably be better off investing in a solar water heater imo. A bit more investment but the return is better and so is the tax credit, because it’s not affected by the 1,500.00 cap.[/quote]

Has anyone used polaralum?

[quote=“billt1111”]

I have the same question. I live in the DFW area and am having a new roof put in on Monday June 8 due to hail damage. I have 53 squares on my roof. My roofer offered me Plaralum for $1000 on top of (and in addition to) the sheathing.

I am familiar with under decking radiant barriers and their approximate 10% to 15% energy cost savings. I don’t know what the effects of this application is and whether it is worth it.

Does anyone have any experience with it?[/quote]

Bill,

i also live in keller, tx.
Whats your thought on Polaralum. tried to reach the owner of polaralum and no one retuned teh call.

i have 34 sq of roof and he is charging 1600 , may I ask you who is your roofer and I would like to get a quote from him too.

ill just say this.
the people who are going to be most happy about you usin polaralum is the company polaralum.

gweedo.

bravo gweeto! you answered the million dollar question!

to answer everyones question,…not only is POLARALUM a heat barrier in the hot climates, it is also a Thermal barrier in the cold climates. It has been documented that in cold temps that polaralum will hold in the heat of the structure, thus lowering the heating cost. Also, if you do NOT live in a warm climate you do not know anything about HOT summers, so DO NOT comment on this product. I have installed this product on hundreds of roofs and have it on my own house. I have customers, that say they can tell a difference the next day after installation. This product really works…As for Florida…If people in that area really knew about this product they would want to use it. It has been tested to a 175 mph wind uplift, and it does NOT tear off. That to me, in a hurricane zone, means a big deal. Shingles and felt will blow off leaving exposed deck to the elimates.(water). The way i look at it is that the proof is in the pudding, and POLARALUM has alot of documented proof. Everyone is wanting to save money in this day and age, and PLOARALUM is a start. I personally have saved 70 dollars on my last elect bill using less KWH, at higher temps(avg 100 deg). Polaralum will not burn your shingles, and WILL save you money, plus you can get a tax credit…Its a win, win situation. People are always concerned about the added cost when reroofing their house, but POLARALUM will pay you back and continue to pay you in the future, just in the savings on your utility bills. So,…look at it in the long run and not in the short run. You CAN save money with POLARALUM!!

1 Like

[quote]to answer everyones question,…not only is POLARALUM a heat barrier in the hot climates, it is also a Thermal barrier in the cold climates. It has been documented that in cold temps that polaralum will hold in the heat of the structure, thus lowering the heating cost. Also, if you do NOT live in a warm climate you do not know anything about HOT summers, so DO NOT comment on this product. I have installed this product on hundreds of roofs and have it on my own house. I have customers, that say they can tell a difference the next day after installation. This product really works…As for Florida…If people in that area really knew about this product they would want to use it. It has been tested to a 175 mph wind uplift, and it does NOT tear off. That to me, in a hurricane zone, means a big deal. Shingles and felt will blow off leaving exposed deck to the elimates.(water). The way i look at it is that the proof is in the pudding, and POLARALUM has alot of documented proof. Everyone is wanting to save money in this day and age, and PLOARALUM is a start. I personally have saved 70 dollars on my last elect bill using less KWH, at higher temps(avg 100 deg). Polaralum will not burn your shingles, and WILL save you money, plus you can get a tax credit…Its a win, win situation. People are always concerned about the added cost when reroofing their house, but POLARALUM will pay you back and continue to pay you in the future, just in the savings on your utility bills. So,…look at it in the long run and not in the short run. You CAN save money with POLARALUM!!


polaralum really works[/quote]

Are you serious? LOL

is keller between dallas and fortworth?

if so then i lived there for 6 months

I too am trying to figure out the benefits of Radiant Barrier, but from what I understand, installing a barrier under shingles is not a true Radiant barrier but a thermal barrier. Radiant barrier requires air on one side, like when you install it inside your attic crawl space. So I don’t know if it qualifies for the credit or not. I would contact the correct govt agency first. I stumbled across this blog post the other day about this. radiantbarrierguru.com/radia … -shingles/

Hope that helps
Steve

Steve- your absolutely right. Polaralum is not a radiant barrier when installed over the decking under shingles. I know the company claims that it is a “thermal barrier” but I would think that the reflectivity of it could backfire as a thermal barrier. I just wouldn’t trust it. The only way to do it right in on the rafters in the attic.

The only way this product makes sense is possibly under some type of metal or tile roofing where you can achieve an air space.

There are a lot of reflective barrier products. They’ve been around for 40 years or more. All of them have “documented” claims of added R value and energy savings. In the lab and some times on jobs they do help save some energy but at a very high cost. If you intend to use one, shop the price and get some testing information. Testing should be done by a major testing lab, not Joe Smiths local testing company. Consider adding more insulation in your attic and weigh the cost between the barrier and added insulation. You know that the insulation works if done properly.

LOL I love how these new members pop up and hype a new product.