Proper installation of california valley

hello all, happy new year!!

I was walking around my roof with my friend and he told me the valleys look better now, the contractor repaired them, but he noticed that the cut they do, goes all the way down the first course, can someone please look at the pictures and tell me if this can lead to future problems
thanks
its not the same valley but they all looked like the firts image.
thanks
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California cut valleys (bottom pic) are for crack heads that can’t afford a knife or shears to cut the shingles. It’s lazy, hack and prone to problems.

Top pic looks like a closed cut valley over a weave. Looks a little sloppy imo but as long as the closed cut part is “crop cut” it should be fine. (Crop cut is where you trim the top end of the shingle that runs into the valley back a couple inches to avoid water running along the top edge as it comes down the valley.)

hey guys been a while …what were looking at is a weaved valley and on bottom thats a soldier course valley…california cut valley is the most common u see…niether of theses are california…

Ya, that bottom one is definitely cheating.

lots of different ways to install a valley! That valley being acceptable and very common.

You are incorrect. The bottom valley is indeed a “California cut” also referred to sometimes as a “Jersey cut”…etc…etc.
docserver.nrca.net:8080/technical/9075.pdf

The wrong information on this forum is staggering.

I agree 100%, with your second statement…
California valleys are fine. They won’t cause any problems as long as they are done right.

It’s fairly well documented that “California cut” valleys are not recommended in areas with heavy rain or snow loads because they can be problematic. You are also in most cases cheating the manufacturer’s recommended seam offset when running your valleys in this way.

ie. It’s crap technique. That is popular opinion, not just my personal opinion.

I’m not going to argue with anyone…however the “California” valley (bottom picture) is a lazy mans valley and well documented to be more prone to problems. It would not be accepted on my jobs and also voids some manufactures warranties.

With that said, roofing is extremely regional. Whats normal practice for you in your area may change if you travel 200 miles. My area is almost all closed cut valleys, other parts of the country are almost all open valleys.

Also to the Original poster…it looks like it’s not done very well…even for a cheat. I would be more concerned with the over exposure of your shingles which means that the shingles are not lined up properly from one course to the next. The proper alingment is the bottom of the upper shingle should line up with the top of the “saw tooth cut out” (or the top of the laminated part of the shingle) of the bottom shingle. It appears they lined up the shingles with the white line on the shingle below it. This white line is a referrence mark for the nails to be placed in, not to line up the next course. Amatuer install.

why we dont do them anymore…looks like chit as well…26gauge painted metal is the way to go…

[quote=“bcdemon”]

I agree 100%, .[/quote]

BAwaaahaha!! good one, Lmfao!!

[quote=“marshall exteriors”]I’m not going to argue with anyone…however the “California” valley (bottom picture) is a lazy mans valley and well documented to be more prone to problems. It would not be accepted on my jobs and also voids some manufactures warranties.

With that said, roofing is extremely regional. Whats normal practice for you in your area may change if you travel 200 miles. My area is almost all closed cut valleys, other parts of the country are almost all open valleys.

Also to the Original poster…it looks like it’s not done very well…even for a cheat. I would be more concerned with the over exposure of your shingles which means that the shingles are not lined up properly from one course to the next. The proper alingment is the bottom of the upper shingle should line up with the top of the “saw tooth cut out” (or the top of the laminated part of the shingle) of the bottom shingle. It appears they lined up the shingles with the white line on the shingle below it. This white line is a referrence mark for the nails to be placed in, not to line up the next course. Amatuer install.[/quote]

Thanks all,

Marshall yes most of my roof is having aligment problems LoL…
my friend mentioned something about the first row where the two sections get together that just stacked two shingles underneath something like that and that water it was going to be able to get inside… but we are not the experts lol

Now that i look at it again i see the top right side is cheated just like the bottom valley too. Doing a 52 fake out like your only getting like a four inch stagger on the staircase method. Which should be atleast six inch minimum.

[quote=“solrac6262”]
Thanks all,

Marshall yes most of my roof is having aligment problems LoL…
my friend mentioned something about the first row where the two sections get together that just stacked two shingles underneath something like that and that water it was going to be able to get inside… but we are not the experts lol[/quote]

Sounds like he is reffering to the starter course which are 2 products stacked on top of each other. The key is to have the tar strips line up so they contact each other to prevent blow offs of the first course. Also the seams of the starter course must be off set to the seams of the first course or there is absolutely potential for leaks or at the very least it will reduce the life of the roof as in time plywood will eventually show (especially in a snow climate).

I
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[quote=“Tar Monkey”]California cut valleys (bottom pic) are for crack heads that can’t afford a knife or shears to cut the shingles. It’s lazy, hack and prone to problems.

I think it was invented after retards with sharp hook blades chopped through hot underlaying shingles.

The shingle up the valley is superior if there is going defined line up the valley. Reason being, all the nails are 7"-8" from the valleys, any water is diverted straight down towards the valley.

With all that being said, I weave my valleys unless there is two pitches meeting on the valley.[/quote]

The hip & ridge caps are high too, it looks to be about an inch higher than where they should be.

Weaving is an antiquated method, lol. You should start a roofing museum.

Solrac that roof looks like shit. Whats with the chimney? Looks like a re-roof humps in every seam, Cali. Valleys do not get cut period. Starter course gets weaved first two rows get woven pop a line and go, after your non valley side is laid properly, split the shingle according to the pitch. Marshal is exactly right on all counts, your roof was scabbed together by either a crackhead or an illegal in both cases they could care less about what they do other than get paid. I would reccomend a lawsuit but you probably alredy know you got what you paid for so good luck with that. Should have went with a company that was reputable like Marshal see his truck you dont have nice shit like that by being a scab, you get it by being a professional. Everyone is a roofer, Solrac pics of your work keep me in bussiness to that I laugh. Sir get a new roof before you have major problems.

haha you did put a big smile on my face, you need to see pictures on my other thread, I count like 30 nail heads exposed, plus some of the shingles that had the overexposure I was barely looking at the nail, the valleys did it wrong the first time, he cut the valley at the 6 or 7th course… now they start from the first course all the shingles are like that overexposed and probably not straight…
they guy came back with the I don’t know if illegals but probably yes, since I am a white hispanic and my spanish is perfect, they pulled shingles out, I had to babysit them for 3 days on my hollidays vacation, I looked yesterday and I have like 15 exposed nails and funky looking valleys …
I email all this issues again telling him about the cabana and some shingles on my roof that are cut and mutilated…
also I am very frustrated regarding the overexposure in all the roof, its driving me crazy, I like to see everything straight or at least the correct way, sorry to say this, but I don’t think this roof was cheap, the workmanship they did was cheap…

what can I do about the overexposure? should I just leave with it or keep telling the guy to come and fix the S*&* his installers did or maybe if not happy take legal action?

man can’t believe they came, fix, go and the roof still needs to be corrected and then they go so fresh like a lettuce…

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like 3 or 4 shingles stacked and also well better look at pictures.
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