Roof leaks in two different locations

I had a reno and addition completed and noticed rain drops falling on an opened awning style window. I checked and found water falling from the soffit of the addition. Investigating the back roof valley it appeared to my untrained eyes that some of the shingles were oriented so as to “catch” water. I applied roof tar and the problem went away. I was told the tar should only be a temporary measure and I needed to have the valley shingle work re-done. See pictures of the work and my tar effort. Will the roofing tar be a good medium term solution?

Additionally, one of our front peak windows (of our addition) has a water leak at the top of it. This Spring I noted icicles on the top soffit, between the top of the window and peak of the roof. I also noted icicles on the soffits at the bottom of the peak (above the garage door) and water had flowed and froze behind the window edge trim. See pictures for better idea of what I am trying to say.

Curious as to the source of the water above the window, I went on top of the roof and saw some flashing had been installed above the shingles. Or should I say: the shingles weren’t installed on top of the flashing? Is that the way it should be done?

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I’ve lived and worked in the extreme south all my life, so I can’t help you with the ice issues but there are plenty of other guys on here who can. However, I can tell you that the flashing is absolutely horrible and that the valley was not laced properly. You need to get a good roofer who specializes in skilled repair work out there as soon as possible.

Yeah that wall and valley are done totally wrong (weaving a valley is acceptable in my book but not like that). As stated you need to have some roofers up there to evaluate everything. Bare minimum that wall and valley need redone, hopefully the rest of the roof is ok.

I have shown the leaky valley work to one of the contractors workers (not the fellow who actually did the work) and he said that they do all their roofs that way. Before he started the shingling project on our roof, he said it would be easy for him to do it himself and save me some money (instead of paying a roofer). He made it sound simple as he shuffled his hands, one on top of the other, while explaining the work. I wasn’t so sure but gave him the benefit of the doubt.

The REALLY big issue as I see it) is that we’ve had foam sprayed on the inside of the sheathing. It acts as our insulation and vapour barrier. I imagine if a roof (or wall) sheet does rot or is water damaged, then we’re in a world of hurt. The sheet will require replacement as well as the inside drywall will require removal to re-apply the spray foam or put in fiberglas batts.

I have sent a picture of the exposed flashing to the contractor and I am awaiting his comment on the work.

I only looked at one of your pics, t.m.i.! Must be my short attention span, a.d.d. or something? Anyways the one I did view was the step flashing on top of the shingles instead of under. Wrong! They’re supposed to be under. Also where the step flashings meet at the apex/ridge they’re wide open for rain/snow/ice to enter. You nd to pull some siding, flat bar the shingles out that meet the wall, grace ice n water 18’’ onto the roof & 18’’ up the wall,( to the sheathing/not the Tyvek!) re shingle & step flash correctly, cap off the top w/a pc of lead, & re install the siding. Done. 1 man day.

Spudster: “I have sent a picture of the exposed flashing to the contractor and I am awaiting his comment on the work”.

If the guy didn’t do any better than whats in the pics you provided when they were working on the job, I would suspect they won’t do any or much better now either. I understand they are responsible and you probably don’t want to have to pay to get it fixed properly but most of the time when a non-roofer type person does a roof for some extra cash, they don’t know how to do “everything” involved and often make these types of mistakes and much worse at times. The more tar and similar crap that is put on the roof, the harder it will be for a pro to fix the mess and will cost more. I recommend hiring a professional roofer to do the job properly once and for all and then send these idiots the bill.

Tar is not the answer. A good roofer doesn’t need tar.

A good roofer always needs tar!
Especially at the bottem of the roof and the protrusions.

No tar skylights?? Lol. Not here!

All the valleys need to be removed and replaced professionally and that wall?? Wow

Yep, Florida is the tar capitol of the United States. Here, just a couple hundred miles over the northern border of the Florida pan handle, I use clear GeoCel 2300 tripolymer construction sealant but nothing at the bottoms. Most houses don’t even have drip edge. Skylights get a little dab of the Geocel at the corners but that’s about it. They don’t even need that if your using the factory made flashing kit.

True, Karnak is code in South Florida. I worked in Fla. for 10 years ,but it’s not needed. With a good install of a good underlayment like Grace High Temp or Carlisle High Temp & correct flashing installations you don’t need tar.

Thanks to everyone for their input.

When I noticed the leaks and took the pictures, I sent them to the contractor - The icicles in the soffits and the icicle hanging under the window trim. His response was: Maybe you’ve got heat loss from the garage door. ??? My interpretation of this is he doesn’t want to deal with me anymore. It’s kinda funny it didn’t work that way when I was paying him!!!

After the snow on the roof melted, I took the picture showing the flashing work he did. I sent it to him and, surprise, to this picture he has not replied…yet. Anyway, insurance will be coming by to have a look soon. I recently had two roofing pros came by and they had a look. Both of them left shaking their heads wondering WHY and WHAT. And maybe some other things not fit to print here.

Sorry to hear it Spudster. I recently repaired a brand new roof for a homeowner that hired the guy that built their screened in back porch addition to roof the whole house after the room was built. They paid $6,000 for the new roof and $3,000 for all the repairs that were needed. At one point during the work I wished that I had bid higher than $3,000 because those guys did many things that made the repairs much more difficult than they had to be. :roll:

LuckyChucky:“At one point during the work I wished that I had bid higher than $3,000 because those guys did many things that made the repairs much more difficult than they had to be.”

One of the roofing pros decided to not attempt to price quote for the work. He said he hated fixing things that are made by others. He couldn’t put a price on the repair and he thought the job has the potential to snowball into a huge time consuming project. Both of the roofing pros who came by said they will only know the scope of the work once they remove some siding and shingles. Speaking of which, the soffits are connected on top of the siding. One of the pros said that he didn’t like that. I guess it means the soffits must be removed before the siding can come off.

[quote=“LuckyChucky”]Spudster: “I have sent a picture of the exposed flashing to the contractor and I am awaiting his comment on the work”.

If the guy didn’t do any better than whats in the pics you provided when they were working on the job, I would suspect they won’t do any or much better now either. I understand they are responsible and you probably don’t want to have to pay to get it fixed properly but most of the time when a non-roofer type person does a roof for some extra cash, they don’t know how to do “everything” involved and often make these types of mistakes and much worse at times. The more tar and similar crap that is put on the roof, the harder it will be for a pro to fix the mess and will cost more. I recommend hiring a professional roofer to do the job properly once and for all and then send these idiots the bill.[/quote]

In GA it is well established that a contractor has the right to repair his own defects, regardless of whether you might want him to or not. I recommend sending him a registered letter advising him of the construction defects and demanding they be repaired. Hopefully he will ignore it and you can move ahead with the repairs and send him the bill, filing suit if he ignores that as well. If he responds to the registered letter then advise him that a real roofer will inspect his repairs before you will sign off on them.

That work is so bad it approaches if not crosses over into negligence. Perhaps I need to get out more but I haven’t seen sidewall flashing done like that.

If you asked me to do repairs, here would be my concern, and I’m simply being honest. The work I saw in your pictures is so horrible, I have no reason to believe the people who did it did anything at all right. Therefore, the only way I could quote it would be to assume the absolute worst. That means, complete replacement. I don’t know how much sidewall you have total but I’m guessing the repairs are going to be at least $2,000 and probably more. Not saying this is you by any means, but you try to help someone out, you get started and all of sudden find out the problem is worse than you first thought. The Customer doesn’t want to hear any of that, says you said you’d fix it, threatens to call BBB, bad report on Angie’s List, blah, blah, blah. So I do a $2000 repair with say $600 of profit in it. And that’s always questionable because it really isn’t that high if you count the trip charges and the time spent quoting it and screwing around with it. Now you’ve got a real headache and it turns into a loser. Aren’t I glad I tried to be Mr. Nice Guy!

I’m sorry to see how badly you were abused, I hope it works out for you.

When we had the reno/addition done, we also had a similar window peak installed on the North side. There is no flashing visible this location, above or below the shingles. See the attached picture. Being on the North side it gets no Spring time sunshine, unlike the leaky Southern exposure step flashed disaster we have. Had a contractor come and look at the non-flashed end of things and he would not commit one way or the other if it was properly done. Anyone willing to comment? All is appreciated as I slowly become enlightened.

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That doesn’t look like metal reflecting back at you above that shingle does it?

Authentic_Dad: “That doesn’t look like metal reflecting back at you above that shingle does it?”

Not that I see.

But, does there absolutely need to be flashing installed at this location? Under the shingles?
I am thinking YES, but I have never laid down so much as a single shingle on any rooftop.

Checked under the step flashed work on the Southern window and saw sheathing and tyvek. The contractor who the insurance company sent was nearly 100% certain that there was flashing or some other barrier there.

A local roofing company stopped by and fixed the roof today.

They applied shingles on top of the existing step flashing and caulking to the junction of the fascia and siding. No siding was removed so maybe they’re confident that there is no serious water damage to the exterior walls. BTW, there is vertical strapping on the outside walls and the siding is attached to the strapping allowing for an air space and exit for any water that gets behind the siding.
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All looks good? Any advice from the experts is always appreciated.
Thanks,
Spud

I hate to have to say it Spudster. I know you’ve been through a lot with roofers already but you didn’t get good repair people either. In the pic with the caulking at the bottom of the roof, it is simply done wrong. You never want to depend on caulking to keep out leaks unless there is no other way. The flashing has to either come out from behind the siding at the bottom or whats called a “kickout” flashing has to be installed there. If not, the water will run in behind the siding at the bottom. Right now caulking is the only thing there to prevent this and when that wears out it will leak behind the siding.

I’m assuming the pic where the bare wood is seen is at the very top middle side. There should be what’s known as apron flashing there, ( an L shaped flashing ). It should be in behind the siding at the wall of the house and down over top of the shingles on the roof part. I noticed there’s not even any caulking. This will leak. Especially during hard blowing rains, blowing directly into the wall of the house.

The step flashings on the walls ( right and left ) doesn’t look good but shouldn’t leak. Step flashing should not be left exposed and hanging out from under the shingle.

Good roofers are hard to find. Again I’m sorry your having so much trouble.