Roofer says shingles don't have to be staggered -- true?

Hi, We had a large portion of our roof re-shingled, and we continue to have leaks underneath the new portion of the roof. It was recently brought to our attention that some of the new shingles are not staggered – instead, they are lined up in a row. When asked for an explanation, our roofer stated that this particular type of shingles can be installed this way.

Our contract states that he used CertainTeed 30 Year Architectural Shingles (Black). Can anyone confirm that it’s okay to install these shingles in a row, or point me to the manufacturer’s guidelines that outline how shingles are to be installed? Thanks!

Where did you find this guy, they must be staggered to spec for Certainteed warranty. I would call another roofer to come do it correctly, best of luck!

http://www.certainteed.com/resources/LandmarkInstall.pdf

Thank you both!

Can you post some pics? This one I gotta see.

Gladly! I have a youtbue video that’s a little over a minute in length but this site doesn’t want me to post a link, so you’ll have to retype this correctly in your browser (i.e., without the spaces).

bit . ly / roofshingles

You’ll see as I mentioned in my original post, it isn’t everywhere – just in a few random places. We’ve had 2 roofers come out to take a look, and one started patching the places he noticed – that’s why you see tar in some of the places where the seams line up. Original roofer still insists that this type of shingle can be installed this way.

I couldn’t find it.

Argh, the forum won’t let me enter a real URL or add images since I’m a new poster. Here it is again … just delete the spaces before & after after the dot and before & after the slash … bit . ly / roofshingles

Over all not a bad looking roof but fixing the problem, and it is a problem, with tar is absolutly wrong. :cry:

Racking limiteds/lifetimes happens more than what you think. I will be tearing off 24sq of new racked limiteds soon.

Racking tabs is debatable and it falls under the IMO category as far as advice goes. But racking arch’s IMO is lazy.

The patching was done with a material that looked like tar, but it was from a paint can so I don’t think it was actually real tar - just black gunk of some sort. What material/product should be used to patch these seam-on-seam areas? Also, the fellow that applied it lifted up the shingles at the seam and put the stuff underneath. Is that correct or should the patch be applied on top (maybe with a caulk gun)? Any tips appreciated!

I have not seen the video. Its your situation and your home but if it were my home I would have the roof replaced by someone who has the ability to install the roof to spec.

Call them back and tell them to remove the shingles, and get a real roofer to install brand new ones. You can get away with racking laminates, you CANNOT get away with what this guy did. And then to come back and “Fix” it with tar? Give me a break.

I wouldn’t pay them a penny until a new roof installed PROPERLY is completed and inspected.

To be honest, that doesn’t look like Certainteed black to me either.

looked to me they not even racked look like they ran straight up without break joints do not pay them, they should not leak even if they were racked :badgrin:

youtu.be/z0_FYB0j2aI

Where are you located at? the reason I ask is 95% of the roofers in my area rack ALL shingles and I just don’t understand how they get away with it ,It seems like I’ve spent half my roofing career arguing the racking vs stair step thing.

I’ll probably get crap for this but…

I tore my chimney down on my house with temps in the low teens. Twas getting dark so I butted the shingles into the existing ones and flattened the copper step flashing to cover the seams. This will never leak, can’t tell from the ground and allowed me to avoid having to cutback and reseal cold stiff shingles to create a stagger.

Didn’t see the video or read the entire thread to see how big of and area was not staggered. If it was a small area a metal flashing slipped under the shingles to cover the seams would be a far better repair than the tar job.

[quote=“selfemployedslave”]I’ll probably get crap for this but…

I tore my chimney down on my house with temps in the low teens. Twas getting dark so I butted the shingles into the existing ones and flattened the copper step flashing to cover the seams. This will never leak, can’t tell from the ground and allowed me to avoid having to cutback and reseal cold stiff shingles to create a stagger.

Didn’t see the video or read the entire thread to see how big of and area was not staggered. If it was a small area a metal flashing slipped under the shingles to cover the seams would be a far better repair than the tar job.[/quote]

You took extra precautions to do a repair on an old roof, this is far different from what happened to the OP and his/her roof.

We’re located in northern Arkansas. We have stopped letting the original roofer do any patching, and we are in the process of finding a new roofer. At this point I’d be happy if we don’t have to completely tear of the 1,500 sq ft of new roof that our old guy installed, but it at this point it is what it is. I really appreciate all the tips / advice.