Roofing cement in valley

Hello,

My father and I took on a small project of roofing his small cabin over the weekend. The cabin had two very small valleys in which we overlapped the shingles and cut the top shingle - 2 inches about valley line (I believe this is a closed cut)

anyway, I took some time off and when I came back my father used roofing cement under the cut shingles. He figured this would keep water from coming in. I didn’t think this was needed and it doesn’t look the greatest with the cement coming out a little. Is this the correct procedure?

Also, the line he cut down the valley was a little crooked. What is the best way to make this cut look proper - Snap a chalk line a cut it with a utility knife!

Thanks for you advice!

My father and I took on a small project of roofing his small cabin over the weekend. The cabin had two very small valleys in which we overlapped the shingles and cut the top shingle - 2 inches about valley line (I believe this is a closed cut)

Yes. Correct.

anyway, I took some time off and when I came back my father used roofing cement under the cut shingles. He figured this would keep water from coming in. I didn’t think this was needed and it doesn’t look the greatest with the cement coming out a little. Is this the correct procedure?

I wouldn’t have done it that way but I don’t see anything wrong with it either. The large draw back is that it makes it much harder to repair.

Also, the line he cut down the valley was a little crooked. What is the best way to make this cut look proper - Snap a chalk line a cut it with a utility knife!

Yes. You can use a hook type blade in a utility knife in the warm weather or a pair of large metal shears (like scissors) in the cooler weather.

Hi,

Yes your father did it right.

You may want to leave the valley cuts alone. With the roof cement under the shingles, it may look worse after you cut it.
**
[size=150]Most important… Leave it alone do not say anything about the work. Except to tell your dad what a great time you had doing the roof with him.[/size]**

Hi,

That is an extra charge to cemnet the valleys. The high end customers pay us for this type of craftsmanship.

Roof cement and craftsmanship are words that should never be used in conjunction of one another, lol.

ifin you read the wraper on a bundle it reads cement under the cut side

lefty knows of what he speaks :wink:

i wish lefty was my dad!!!

“ifin you read the wraper on a bundle it reads cement under the cut side”

  1. Maybe I’m out of touch I haven’t read a shingle wrapper in quite a few years.

  2. I know what “ifin” means as I lived down south for almost 9 years. However i really can’t take someone seriously that would actually use it in a sentence.

  3. I must be an amazing roofer because I have for years and years laid asphalt shingle valleys that don’t leak without cementing them. (I always crop cut.)

Hey, whatever you think is best is fine. As I stated there is nothing wrong with tarring the valley. Call it good practice if you must but don’t call it craftmanship. Creating a slate spire or a true standing seam barrel roof is craftsmanship. Slinging tar I could hire a monkey to do, hence my sarcastic pseudonym. Only grade school kids consider mushing goop “crafting”, lol.

everything has a place,you seem to have a high opinion of yourself,good for you

hmmm…
Just replaced some asphalt shingles because the tar caused water to pond under the tar sealed laps. It ate away the felt and installed a waterfall! I guess a waterfall installed in a home is nice craftsmanship but only when it was planned. :mrgreen:

“…you seem to have a high opinion of yourself,good for you”

Says the guy who named himself “god”, nice.

:shock:

I learned the trade to also not cement or hand seal my vallys. just dont need to. they did not use I&W when I started roofing either. just felt or roll roofing in vally, 1980s. some of the roofs I did then are still doing good. We did have a big problem in the north east with the Bird shingles class action suit.

RooferJim

www.jbennetteroofing.com