Shingle failure - hi wind or hi nailing

Several sections of a 15 year old roof blew off during a high wind event a couple of months back. The nailing pattern is high, but I’m not sure if it’s too high for this type of shingle. The location is inland and New England.

Assuming where the pen tip is is the location of the nail, then way to high.

looks like 2" over the nail line?

or am i seeing things?

That’s where the nailing is, at the tip of the pen. It’s what I thought, but wanted to hear it from some seasoned pro’s. I’ve seen a GAF reference for Ultra’s with a hi-nail option, wasn’t sure if this applied to older shingles.

If they couldn’t line up the shingles and give decent side lap, I’m not surprised they couldn’t nail on the line.

Hmmmm, makes me wonder if they were using nail guns. :smiley:
Nail Guns vs Hand Nailing

It also looks as though one of the underlying nails are cutting the shingle above and that location appears to be about four inches too high. Also looks like there is a nail in the butt joint.

Hi,

Also looks like a staple in that shingle.

It is nailed high and the nails are not nailed right either.

I think that area is blown loose and slide down

They mustve been handnailin and not paying attention,happens all the time with handnailers… :roll:

Bigger problems with that roof than the high nails,lol.When you dutch lap,they tend not to seal as well.

I appreciate the feedback, I just didn’t want to miss something. The shingles fell off in a section and the homeowner slid them back up and placed a few nails to hold it while they get it repaired.

We had some 70 mph winds in the area, but high nailing nixes their coverage.

except it looks to me like those were manufactured to lap like that so it isn’t really a problem. The high nailing is a issue though but apparently not too bad of one if they went 15 yrs with no problems. The shingles they put back in don’t look bad either, put back into place properly and hand sealed they should stay for the rest of the roofs life. To avoid any other blow offs I would ck for any not sealed down and reseal them also unless of course your planning on replacing the roof anyway

[quote=“Jalanci”]I appreciate the feedback, I just didn’t want to miss something. The shingles fell off in a section and the homeowner slid them back up and placed a few nails to hold it while they get it repaired.

We had some 70 mph winds in the area, but high nailing nixes their coverage.[/quote]

A storm is a storm. I don’t know much about insurance work, but they were fine before the storm right?

[quote=“RooferR”]

[quote=“Jalanci”]I appreciate the feedback, I just didn’t want to miss something. The shingles fell off in a section and the homeowner slid them back up and placed a few nails to hold it while they get it repaired.

We had some 70 mph winds in the area, but high nailing nixes their coverage.[/quote]

A storm is a storm. I don’t know much about insurance work, but they were fine before the storm right?[/quote]

Sounds like the insurance company is looking for an out.

15 yr old shingles in a 70 mph wind. Thats wind damage.

I work with a lot of insurers, some atty’s and it’s pretty interesting to see which ones cover and which don’t. In this case, most would cover because there was good evidence of a severe storm, however, the insurer’s expert arrived and called it poor workmanship due to high nailing and they’ve claimed it’s an exclusion and they don’t have to pay.

Even though most would likely cover this claim, I will say this, most are all on the lookout for subrogation! This one is way past statute of limitations, so it’s not viable.

I do see a lot of them making subro claims against contractors when they replace a roof and don’t address poor ventilation. If your client doesn’t want you to fix his ventilation, document it in your contract with a separate initial.