Standing Seam Double Lock Question

Evening all… Im doing a double lock Standing seam roof. I have completed roughly 100-150 jobs in my life time, small jobs- commercial, yadda yadda, I today was bending up rake metal and was thinking what are other people doing and how are they doing it. I came up with 3 different ways of doing it with each actually having a double lock. HOW ARE YOU PEOPLE doing your rakes?. I use a lock strip nailed to the rake with fabricated double edge rake metal that locks to the first panel,(which one side of the panel has to be reworked 1"x3/8"x1/4"down)

the rake metal I make has 1"(over-the-roofline-) 1/2"x1/4" on it for the double lock into the panel. Is there an easier way people have come up with? I been doing it like this for almost 30 years, but all ways willing to do something new if there is anything worth a damn going on now and easier. Curious for the responses. I use standard no#1 and no#2 benders unfortunately I do not have a machine. (if anyone in the Northern Va area knows where I could rent one would be most appreciated) dont really do enough metal to buy one.

Thanks

Steve

http://www.albertsroofing.com/Tin%20Roofing%20photo_gallery.htm

All my panels are custom fit, so using just 3-4 machine panels slow things down when I start to tie things in.

I’m not 100% sure as to what you are asking, bet here is how I prefer to do the rake edge:

Pic 1:

Pic 2 - done:

Also, when you say double lock - you don’t imply snap-lock, but rather a panel with two straight ribs and then another piece snapping over two adjoining ribs, locking into a clip - correct?

If not, please post a picture of this double lock.

Take a look at this rake detail.

Your 1st/last panel will slide into the sleeve, cover with rake trim…you will be able to install screws on top of the rade and to the side. this design helps to align the rake better.

We also box the end to cover the rafter tails.

http://www.roofing.com/images/topics/10401/img_1292244314.jpg

This is what I normally do for a double lock standing seam roof. was looking for other ways of doing it.

sleevecc,

Your detail is correct.

There are other ways to finish the rake, but I think that is the best.

[quote=“sleevecc”]http://www.roofing.com/images/topics/10401/img_1292244314.jpg

This is what I normally do for a double lock standing seam roof. was looking for other ways of doing it.[/quote]

Does the rake metal get fastened at all or snap into place?

The lock strip is nailed or screwed to the fascia, no exposed fastners.I do a d style drip edge and lock into it.This photo shows the seam on the the rake not always possible,we center our panels before installing them.

I should have pointed out on my link that eaves and rakes get the same detail. Sometimes left ‘horizonal’ with the palne of the roof, sometimes folded over and down the rake. The rake and eave strips are nailed 4" OC.
5 of mine have been subjected to tornados over the years. Haven’t had any lift yet.

Tinner , the way you are doing your tin as you posted before is how I do tin. but man I aint trying to do that with 24-26 steel, and 032 aluminum will prolly break with those folds… I learned from doing what you show with tin and copper. AWESOME Stuff… never see any tin roofs go on anymore round here and seldom copper.

my rakes end looking like that regardless of where I start , I just have to prefab a pan to end with, and yes I get a general middle of the roof so i dont have a 2" pan on the opposite rake, LOL

We lock into our drip edge so width really dont matter,i have a rollformer so breaking the rake is not an option.Your sketch works but not the way i prefer we hand break it and crimp it to the drip,i find it more attractive.The one with the screws in the face i find offensive,if your doing standing seam you dont have screws all over it.R panel,5 v crimp and corragated have screws not standing seam.

we would lock it to the drip edge. simple.

Locking it to the drip edge would certainly help.

If you are using someone like MBCI, I would suggest looking at their website for information.

mbci.com/doublelok.html