Standing seam roof job gone bad - what would you do?

I’m the homeowner. We contacted a large name standing seam manufacturer (local) and asked them for a list of contractors they would recommend to install their product. We took this list and went with the middle bid to have a new aluminum standing seam roof, trim, and gutters put on our house. When the work was done I asked the manufacturer if they would come out and take a look at the job because I thought the valleys were done strangely (our valleys end mid panel instead of at the eave, like you might see on a dormer). The crew cut halfway into the panels the valleys emptied onto and weaved the valley onto the top of the pan. The rep from the manufacturer said he couldn’t see anything wrong with it so we made our final payment to the contractor.

Then a couple of weeks later we had our first heavy rain that lasted for a couple of days and water was leaking into our walls on the house on both valleys. It took the roofer six weeks and 5 trips back before the problem was solved. The way they solved it was by sliding a longer pan under the end of the valley and using a lot of sealant.

So now we have a roof that has seen a lot of foot traffic and prying up of panels trying to diagnose the problem. There are dings and scratches everywhere and there’s a lot of visible and ugly sealant on the valleys of our brand new roof. We obviously aren’t happy about this and haven’t talked to the roofer yet but I was wondering what your company would do in this situation? I understand the roofer has spent a lot of time already to address this problem and fixing it would require him to purchase new materials and re-do the roof, but that’s really not our fault and I don’t feel that we should be stuck with a roof that really looks like crap because of it.

Pics?

They put the panels on wrong and need to replace them.

The lower panel runs up past the valley.
The valley metal runs over that lower panel all the way to the outside seam. Up and over the rib/standing seam.
Then the upper panel is laid over, and seamed to, the valley panel.

Good luck

I am getting you completely,buddy.What do you wanna say?

A good roofer on a new roof shouldnt need any caulking. Send some pics.

Ok, I figured out how to get pictures uploaded.

This is after the initial install:
http://www.roofing.com/forum/gallery/image.php?album_id=390&image_id=1401

This is the opposite valley after repair:
http://www.roofing.com/forum/gallery/image.php?album_id=390&image_id=1400

AAAgghhh that is so wrong…you have to do what dennis said and yes i would have someone exp. replace…

Still going to leak, installed incorrectly. Bucking panels and relying on sealant alone. Becomes maintenance issue. Make it get corrected and use legal methods required to hold contractor accountable.

After seeing that I would be concerned about the rest of the roof.

Let the manufacturer know about this company so they will stop referring them.

Roofing like most things in life are about common sense. These installers have little.

This roof should be replaced along with the failing underlayment. The two photos are not of the same valley, I can only assume there are more valleys done incorrectly.

I do feel bad for you as you seem like a kind person and willing to allow these clowns to make yet another attempt to fix their mess- but man they cut the valley five times and it is still too short and you think they are capable of doing it right next time? Thats crazy thoughts.

My advise to you:
Pay a qualified Standing Seam Roofing Contractor to detail a repair resolution but don’t ask for it free, thats just rude.
Present that to your Roofer and Representative and the Branch Manager. Ask them how they will make it right- After all, they are in bed together.

The underlayment didn’t fail, the water was running down the ice and water shield all the way to the eave. My eves only have about 3" of overhang (poor original construction) and they had solid wood fascia and soffit. The water was running down the back of the fascia board, hitting the soffit, and then running back into the wall.

They also didn’t cut the valley five times, they were just out several times looking for the problem in the wrong place.
Trip 1: Did a water test (just spraying into the air) and verified there was indeed a leak, re-sealed a joint in the ridge cap.
Trip 2: Identified a spot where water was getting behind the fascia on both sides of the roof where the fascia met a side wall, so they caulked that spot and wanted to let it dry before doing another water test.
Trip 3: Came out and did a more thorough water test - identified the valleys as the problem
Trip 4: Met at the house with the manufacturer to look at the problem, it was raining so no work was done
Trip 5: Applied sealant to ends of valley

I agree with you and I am surprised that the roofing manufacturer thinks that sealant is an appropriate way to seal the valley on a standing seam roof.

Then a couple of weeks later we had our first heavy rain that lasted for a couple of days and water was leaking into our walls on the house on both valleys.

The underlayment didn’t fail, the water was running down the ice and water shield all the way to the eave. My eves only have about 3" of overhang (poor original construction) and they had solid wood fascia and soffit. The water was running down the back of the fascia board, hitting the soffit, and then running back into the wall.

Well my mistake?

Those two left hand valleys are incorrect. I will leave it at that. Best of luck.

Sealant is not the answer, those valleys need to be ripped out and re done by someone who knows what they are doing…paid by the person who f’d it up.And like Axiom said, I wonder what the rest looks like… :frowning:

Some silly looking work there. It should have looked like this.
[attachment=2]Dorma Detail on SS Roof.JPG[/attachment]

Or this.
[attachment=1]Standing Seam Copper Roof Valley Detail.jpg[/attachment]

Here’s a glimpse or the working detail underneath that you cannot see. Done correctly, no caulk will ever be necessary except in rare instances when over lapping certain metal panels to shortcut the capilary potential and that caulk will be well underneath and invisible.
[attachment=1]Standing Seam Copper Roof Valley Detail.jpg[/attachment]

In case you are wondering about that bit of unfolded flap, it’s been observed that water gets pastt he locking seam in the valley. THe water needs to freely escape from behind that seam before it can casue any mischief. Thei prevents any water buildup that may casue it to reach the outer valley hem.

Thanks for the responses everyone. I showed this post to my roofer. He has been great about standing behind his work and he was concerned when I told him I (and you guys) thought it was done wrong and needed to be fixed. He met with the standing seam manufacturer to discuss my issue and your posts. The roofer is coming back out in a few weeks and will fix the valley details.