Step Flashing and Hardie Plank

New guy here… I’m a home owner that has had to play roofer over the past several days. I’m putting down asphalt shingles and I’m looking for any tips or tricks for getting the underlayment and step flashing tucked up under Hardie Plank plank without too much damage. I just completed a the tear off and fixed numerous sheathing problems. I have left the old step flashing in place and it appears to be still in good shape. Most of it is loose but there are a few that have siding nails through them. The gap between the roof deck and siding is only about 2 inches or so.

If your existing flashing is in reusable shape reuse it.

If you need to replace step flashing you need to pull the nails in the Hardiplank that are closest to the roof deck.
Once you pull the right nails you can carefully pull out the Hardiplank far enough to slide the new steps behind it.

If you pull it too far the Hardiplank will break, you will get a feel for this after you break the first one.

There is a good reason the majority of us don’t like working with Hardiplank.

Nothing bugs me more than step flashing that is nailed to a wall.If possible I would replace as much of the flashing as possible.

I use a nail bar/prybar/L bar.They come in different sizes.Use a smaller one and GENTLY pull the siding loose away from the wall.I would not pull on the siding no more than an 1/8" at a time.Pull the nails closest to the roof deck as Axiom stated.

If the siding is off the roof deck 2" then 4" would be what I would try for.Any less I would be a bit skeptical.It might be too tight for both underlayment and step.

It’s always an option to pop a line 2"1/2-3 off the shingled area and cut the siding so you can allow for access with larger step.It takes some experience to pull off.

2 inches is a big gap. You might be able to pull out the nails in the way, working carefully behind and on top of the siding with pry bars, a drill and pliers (needle nose and regular). As stated, be careful not to break the siding. Hardiboard is a good product for longevity, but it does break if bent. Also, nails will pull right through the siding easily (and remain in the step flashing) if you can’t get a hold of the nail head before pulling. I agree that keeping the nails in place is best if you can reuse the step flashing. Just caulk the nail holes, if they are not already done.

Without being there, the million other tricks we all have can’t be determined for best results. That’s why we often recommend a roofer, not because we are greedy.

If the step flashing is in decent shape you can nail it back down into the new roof system. Two inch gap is quite a bit. Hope you have the 8x8in step flashing as the smaller version won’t allow much of a head lap under the siding. Most commonly you see an inch gap from the shingles to the hardi board. See it with no gap as well from time to time and then you get flaking paint and rotted hardi board.

Yes, hardi board will rot, seen it on a 3 year old house already!

[quote=“dougger222”]If the step flashing is in decent shape you can nail it back down into the new roof system. Two inch gap is quite a bit. Hope you have the 8x8in step flashing as the smaller version won’t allow much of a head lap under the siding. Most commonly you see an inch gap from the shingles to the hardi board. See it with no gap as well from time to time and then you get flaking paint and rotted hardi board.

Yes, hardi board will rot, seen it on a 3 year old house already![/quote]

Call Hardi. It is guaranteed for LIFE, and they will absolutely pay material and labor to replace it.

Hardie will deteriorate. Never seen it in 3 years though. And I’m fairly certain 2 inches is the required gap by hardie now. 5x5 flashing is fine.