Stuck with a minimal roof slope

I am putting a roof over a side entrance doorway which will continue across to a shed that will be built up against the house for storage and egress to a basement. I am limited by a window and brick sill that defines the upper slope of the roof. The bottom of the roof is defined by a reasonable height to make the entrance look “open” and allow for clearance of a 80" shed door.

The slope ends up being a shallow 7.5 degrees or about a 1.6 pitch. Codes either prohibit(?) or do not recommend shingles on such a shallow pitch. I see no statements made to support or prohibit such a practice in my permit area. All house roofs are slate, slate composite (ok - but would never do it again), or rubber slatelike (I like!). My plan is to use some hefty form of ice and snow shield or heavier, tighten up the overlaps so that no one area has less than a double layer, then roof with rubber slate using a tighter expose to further address the lack shallow slope.

Any ideas to improve this? The rubber slate is key to the continuity of look for this traditional styled house. I do not want the look of roll roofing. Unless I am missing something this approach seems almost like overkill to address even the mild slope issue.

How about just putting a rubber roof on it?

I want the look of slate as I stated. This home is granite masonry, slate roofs, copper downspouts, etc. I want to keep it consistent stylewise. Are you saying to put a rubber roof on then put the slate over it?

Can you even see much of it from the ground?

It is an entrance area with a “fancied” up shedlike storage structure to make it look in keeping with the home style. It is a low roof and will be seen easily from both the driveway, the sidewalk and the road. No way to hide it.

Why is there a hesitency to use a ice and snow shield underlayment, the premium type that allows nails to mold around it plus on top of it the rubber slate? I’m not seeing the problem areas. It is not a heated space. What am I missing?

I can’t come up with any other options that perhaps a pro can come up with.

[quote=“Metallic Mike”]It is an entrance area with a “fancied” up shedlike storage structure to make it look in keeping with the home style. It is a low roof and will be seen easily from both the driveway, the sidewalk and the road. No way to hide it.

Why is there a hesitency to use a ice and snow shield underlayment, the premium type that allows nails to mold around it plus on top of it the rubber slate? I’m not seeing the problem areas. It is not a heated space. What am I missing?

I can’t come up with any other options that perhaps a pro can come up with.[/quote]

You can do it this way. It will probably be ok. But it is against all manufacturers specifications. I know EcoStar’s cutoff is a 3/12 pitch. Just increase your headlap to 4" and you will probably be fine.
The thing about the ice shield, is that it will seal around nails, but if water is still getting there on a regular basis, the nails will rust and it will still leak.

Thanks for the advice! I checked out your website. You guys appear to be at the high end of reliability and delivery curve, at least that is the sense I get! Much like my slate repair roofer in my area!

Headlap of 4"? I was already going to essentially overlap by 50% of width if not more and tighten up on the rubber “slates” for less expose to boot. I’m quoting me at zero labor! 8)

I often do stuff that doesn’t suit “convention”. It’s my house, my ultimate choices, my installations, so it’s me in the mirror alone. Have not had a problem in 24 years at this house. If I were a contractor and were pressed by the homeowner I’d have to figure out a hold harmless if it sounded reasonable but violated something or another. Naysaying is a reason to research harder and find the workaround. I have to deal with this in my company every day!

BTW, I would use copper or 400 grade SS for such applications, never galv dipped or zinc flashed! Look at my screen name, if there is one thing I do know it is metallurgy. I can get my pick of the material from my metals customers :smiley:

A double batten system is what I reccommend to my customers who insist on Tiling a low slope roof, but you have clearance issues. It is a flat roof as far as specification and codes are concerned. So here is the spec. Nail tg-2 or layfast, 1 18" strip of stormguard or equal ran 1" down facshia before Installing edge metal. Then double layer of stormguard, then Rubber Slates? :slight_smile:

The Roof to wall flashing is paramount to the success of this application Mike!

Thanks for the additional advice! Excellent techniques to use.

Yes, I know that the roof is problematic based on the restrictions that I explained in the first email. But it is what it is. I even had to do some very tight measurements as the slope issues also impacted the metal security door clearance on the shed on the down slope end. Don’t ask for an explanation, not really important in the overall scheme of things, sufficed, mission accomplished. It does violate traditional “protocols” but then again can’t we think of all sorts of real world workarounds that end up being just fine? It is MY work on MY house so it is ON ME. I have to do this in my line of work often as well. Tantamount to “calling an audible on the line…”

I asked my wife about laying copper sheet with battens. I have a 10’ sheet bender. To my mind, it would be the ULTIMATE with no joint from top of tabbed in flashing on wall to above gutter! No go from her approval standpoint. She fears it will be stolen and thinks that for the application it would look a bit pretentious. I offered to put a rapid patina on it to get it to green ASAP. Still no go. It is actually about the same price as the rubber slates, all things considered and my free labor.

Roof to wall flashing will be copper and will be tucked up the wall about six inches up (maybe more since the roof slope is so flat…got to ponder) my usual way of affixing flashing to the granite block construction. A ~3/8" ground groove into the granite at a 45 degree angle upwards where the copper flashing locks in via a same angled flashing tab.

Mixing metals is bad galvanic series mojo! So, copper everywhere.

I even ran water down a similar slope just to see how fast (or slow) it will run and envisioned (on paper) blockage at given heights to see where the back up would be. Thank God for ice and snow shield (I’m using top end Grace product, no granules) The porch roof section closest to the house is a northern exposure with a second story blocking the sun, so I may add heat tape there as I did up above to prevent ice damming on a slate roof that does not have ice and snow shield on it (1952 vintage!). I like challenges like these and since I had no say in the original work, I’m stuck with it as it is.

Thanks for all the advice! You guys are the experts. This is my hobby. I’d go out of business if tis is what I did for a living, especially these days. Everyone wants cheap, not built like a granite…well, you know!