Summer thunderstorms

I got caught in the rain today. It rained last friday, monday and tuesday. they were calling for a chance (20%) of late day (5pm) showers today. We got nearly hail for about 10 minutes at a little after 2. We had the shingles run about half way up the rear of the house. I bit the bullet and tarped it in the rain but of course it didn’t continue after that. Everything was too wet for us to do anything else anyway. No water got in the house thankfully.

So I guess my question is how a lot of you guys handle the summer storms. We have a chance for thunderstorms like 3 days of every week in the summer. Most times it doesn’t rain, so I hate to lose all that time cause i’m afraid of it. Whats the plan in uncertain weather? Day off? Tarp on hand? Keep working in the rain? I hate that last one cause I don’t think running shingles over wet felt is a good idea. Any input appreciated

I am a smaller business with only 2 crews but so I can afford to take the odd day off cause the storms and rains. But when there is a chance of rain I keep a roll of IKO Roofguard SB which is an expensive waterproof underlay up here in Canada about 140 per roll, one roll will do 10 squares. So when I think it might rain I dont un-cover more than 10 squares so if it does rain I can quickly felt it in and continue working or leave it and come back when the rain stops.

Hi Aroofing,
You are talking about synthetic underlayment I think? That is a good idea. A new tarp is nearly the same price but much harder to work with and homeowners love blue roofs.

Yes I am referring to synthetic underlay I have found it to be the best solution. If anyone has any other suggestions let me know. Heres a link to the product im talking about.

http://www.iko.com/products/residential/residential.asp?task=ProductDetails&product_id=660&region_id=18

Do you lay it right over top of 15# felt?

the synthetic underlayment is great. it is not even slick when it is wet, and it wont tear off with the wind.

i had the last 3 days off from all the rain in CT. tomorrow is 30% and we are going to see what happens.

Yes over top, If possible I try and up sell the homeowner to this underlayment instead of 15 felt on houses makes it easier to walk and you can rook the house in the rain without any real worry, even though my guys dont like working in the rain, they do like getting paid. I have never had a any problems with the house leaking or decking getting wet with this on. One thing you need to know is that you cant put it on with a hammer tacker or nail gun, you need to use roof nails with a washer. I forget what they are called but you can buy a huge pail of them at most hardware stores.

button caps… I love them

A 20% chance can make me more nervous in the Summer then a 40% chance in the Spring or Fall. Seen hail and twisters come out of a 20% chance.

I only use once crew so we can only do so many tear offs per year, typically 70, although over half are large houses. The small houses (30-35sq) we get done in a day so that helps with keeping the roof dry.

We keep a lot of tarps on hand including large new ones in the event of a rain which can happen on days with a 0% chance. Also carry a 10sq roll of syn felt which has never been used going on a year now.

On windy or days that rain can form after the 5am weather man said no rain we will leave as much felt on as possible and only after the whole section is torn off and nails are pulled will we remove the felt and i/w and felt over. IF we think it may rain we tear off piece by piece and start from the top and felt from the top down. This method works best on steep roofs when the debris goes down rather than up and over. This way if you have to tarp you cut tuck it under the felt put down a 2x4 and secure the bottom of the tarp at the eave.

In the past 5 years doing mostly tear offs and 300+ roofs have never had water intrusion from start to finish. My family of roofers with over 100 total combined years being insured have never filed a liabilty claim.

[quote=“dougger222”]A 20% chance can make me more nervous in the Summer then a 40% chance in the Spring or Fall. Seen hail and twisters come out of a 20% chance.

I only use once crew so we can only do so many tear offs per year, typically 70, although over half are large houses. The small houses (30-35sq) we get done in a day so that helps with keeping the roof dry.

We keep a lot of tarps on hand including large new ones in the event of a rain which can happen on days with a 0% chance. Also carry a 10sq roll of syn felt which has never been used going on a year now.

On windy or days that rain can form after the 5am weather man said no rain we will leave as much felt on as possible and only after the whole section is torn off and nails are pulled will we remove the felt and i/w and felt over. IF we think it may rain we tear off piece by piece and start from the top and felt from the top down. This method works best on steep roofs when the debris goes down rather than up and over. This way if you have to tarp you cut tuck it under the felt put down a 2x4 and secure the bottom of the tarp at the eave.

In the past 5 years doing mostly tear offs and 300+ roofs have never had water intrusion from start to finish. My family of roofers with over 100 total combined years being insured have never filed a liabilty claim.[/quote]

Sounds like a pretty good efficient system.

Ok I’ll now ask the reverse question. So what if there is 0% chance of rain, and sun predicted for the next week. Would you tear off and leave bare plywood showing if the temperature stays relatively warm overnight?

O% chance of rain doesn’t apply to roofing. I remember my first year on my own. Homeowner wanted to save money and tear off and felt and I would shingle. End of day him and his buddy had a good section of the roof tore off and were to beat to cover it. He said the weatherman said no rain tonight. Left it open. About three am I woke to thunderstorms.
I’d never leave a roof open.

No, you always dry in what you tore off, without exception, ever…

Ideally you would shingle it the same day, but this isn’t an ideal world…

get out there early and shingle till it rains.
when it stops get up there again.

gweedo.

http://c2.ac-images.myspacecdn.com/images02/68/l_d090e0b954a143eca38037f77432e2a1.jpg

The felt above the pipe boot is actually tucked under the vertical felt u just put a slice in it with your handy dandy hook blade slide it under there and staple away. Yes I said staple :stuck_out_tongue:

Felt it and forget it. That felt water tight method outlasted 2 weeks of snow, prevailing winds, and rain. Not all on the same job site of course. And I HATE button caps always smash my little fingers and shingles over them are all lumpy lookin like u got high nails everywhere or little nipples all over the roof.

Once there was some snow coming that well we didn’t know about omg… were talkin 30 sq. i think 4 skylights (it’s been a while) chimney with a cricket, pipe, 2 power vents, and 2 bay windows extending from the roof surface. It was one busy roof anyway it was all under felt stapled set all the flashings in place and stapled ice and water down. It sat under at least a foot of snow for 2 weeks and didn’t leak. You might call it luck I call it skills :stuck_out_tongue:

Another job apartment complex 75 sq with a large corn field behind it in a town of 30 some odd ppl (I think they all lived in the apartment complex lol) we tore off the whole back side of it and felted it in cause felt skills are supreme :P. Was nothing in the forecast. We came back the next morning to the apartment manager talkin about the tornato that touched down in the corn field and how ppl’s lawn furniture was blowin around etc… the roof was still water tight none of the felt was damaged.

Course I have never and will never leave a roof uncovered. Gotta have felt on there even if rain isn’t in the forecast there is still the occasional spot shower, idiot weather man, dew, etc…

I do it pretty similiar to you SYS.Except for my patch is a wee-bit wider and I slip it in under the next row of felt.Looks good!

Hello,
When I first started roofing we left a roof uncovered because there was nothing forecasted for that night. I told the boss we should at least tarp it. He said no. Well I grew up in Central Va(Lynchburg), He was from Louisiana so I knew the weather a little bit better. Summer showers pop up all the time. The thunderstorm only lasted about 10 minutes but it did over 100K worth of damage.150 year old oak desk ruined :frowning: .
It was a harsh lesson for my boss to learn but one that I learned also. Never leave it uncovered Period.

Keith

That does not look water-tight to me.

What I do on all of my pipes, is an old method used from modified bitumen.

I take a square section of Ice and Water Shield and hold it to the top of the pipe.

I then tap the Ice and Water Shield to the Inner Diameter of the pipe with my hammer/hatchet and go around the entire inner perimeter, until I can pull the circle out of the Ice and Water square.

Then remove the wax paper and slide it down on the pipe penetration by wiggling it back and forth until it gets down to the deck and then tuck in in with your fingers.

By using the Inner Diameter, the I & W will curl upwards on the outer perimeter of the pipe and remain very tight.

Ed

[quote=“SYS”]http://c2.ac-images.myspacecdn.com/images02/68/l_d090e0b954a143eca38037f77432e2a1.jpg

The felt above the pipe boot is actually tucked under the vertical felt u just put a slice in it with your handy dandy hook blade slide it under there and staple away. Yes I said staple :stuck_out_tongue:

Felt it and forget it. That felt water tight method outlasted 2 weeks of snow, prevailing winds, and rain. Not all on the same job site of course. And I HATE button caps always smash my little fingers and shingles over them are all lumpy lookin like u got high nails everywhere or little nipples all over the roof.

Once there was some snow coming that well we didn’t know about omg… were talkin 30 sq. i think 4 skylights (it’s been a while) chimney with a cricket, pipe, 2 power vents, and 2 bay windows extending from the roof surface. It was one busy roof anyway it was all under felt stapled set all the flashings in place and stapled ice and water down. It sat under at least a foot of snow for 2 weeks and didn’t leak. You might call it luck I call it skills :stuck_out_tongue:

Another job apartment complex 75 sq with a large corn field behind it in a town of 30 some odd ppl (I think they all lived in the apartment complex lol) we tore off the whole back side of it and felted it in cause felt skills are supreme :P. Was nothing in the forecast. We came back the next morning to the apartment manager talkin about the tornato that touched down in the corn field and how ppl’s lawn furniture was blowin around etc… the roof was still water tight none of the felt was damaged.

Course I have never and will never leave a roof uncovered. Gotta have felt on there even if rain isn’t in the forecast there is still the occasional spot shower, idiot weather man, dew, etc…[/quote]

Hello,

Ed, that is how we do them also. We call them A**holes because they look like they are puckered around the pipe :mrgreen:

Keith

Ed,good idea you had.Upon further inspection the bottom of the lead should be on the paper.And with a wider patch tucked under proceeding course of felt,I would call it watertight.Done many that way and never leaked.