W valley flashing. Any reason to not use 24 gauge stainless

I have to replace the roof on my ranch. Hip roof. I’m planning on using W metal valley flashing for the valley. Recommendations seem to be copper, aluminum or galvanized. For me, copper is too ornate and galvanized not long lasting enough.

Why can’t I use 24 gauge stainless instead? My local sheet metal shop can make me 24 inch wide W valley flashing for a reasonable price.

Any reason to not do this?

Thanks.

I have never heard of stainless steel valley flashings, but I don’t see why there would be a problem. Except of course it’s very reflective, more so than galvanized.

Can’t you find any painted “W” metal in your area?

I’m with BC. A factory painted thick aluminum that matches the shingle color you selected would be the most inconspicuous.

The thin aluminum is not worth a crap.

You could also do closed cut valleys where just a smooth piece of metal is installed first and then covered with the shingles. Doesn’t matter very much what valley material is used when done this way as long as its not thin aluminum.

IMO…enamel coated steel is best for performance, durability and aesthetics.

You can, I love stainless. Just make sure your installer uses stainless nails as well.

stainless would be over kill, imo. Painted metal whether steel or other wise, will last the life time of your shingles and will give you the option of a color match

I’ve never thought about stainless for valleys. Good idea. And as mentioned before, it will be very reflective and prepainted steel would blend in much nicer… unless you want it to stand out or have a very light grey color shingle in mind.

Did you end up using the stainless? If so, how did it go?

Yes. Cutting it was very difficult, but it has held up nicely.

Thanks for the reply. Glad to hear that it has held up. When searching the web I found some architectural stainless which is not glossy/reflective made by a company called Roofinox. It is advertised as being made of a special malleable alloy so that it can be shaped with a hand seamer. I will have to find out if it is also any easier to cut than normal stainless sheet.

I’ve used it once but it was a long time ago. I still remember it being on the harder side to cut. Mrblint, what kind of roof are you installing that you are thinking about such an exotic metal? As others have said it is completely overkill on a shingle roof (and a waste of your $ imo) but a great idea on a slate or tile roof.

We have red cedar now, and if we re-roof with cedar, it will be Alaskan
Cypress/Yellow Cedar, which weathers to a gray and that would look good
with matte stainless. The tannic acids in cedar can make pinholes in
copper valleys over time, so if the malleable matte stainless is in the
same price-range as copper, and is as workable as copper, I see little
reason not to choose it over copper.

P.S. We only have two valleys, each about 15’ long, so it’s not going to be a huge price differential in any case.
The Roofinox stainless can be soldered (they sell a special non-rusting flux).

Good call. I actually agree that the terne coated stainless will match great with a cedar roof as it ages!

They do sell terne coated, but I’m looking at their “Classic”, which is not TCS, but SS through and through.