What to do with rolled roof edges on tudor - pics included

The house is a 50 year old split-level Tudor that is built into a hill side. The landscaping is fabulous using river rock to add to the Tudor/cottage design. It’s time to re-roof the house and the rolled roof edges really detract from the design of the house as shingles curl up and the roof line isn’t clean. Any suggestions on how to get rid of or modify the rolled edges during re-roofing?

http://www.roofing.com/images/topics/9465/img_1272827905.gif
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http://www.roofing.com/images/topics/9465/img_1272828356.jpg

Photos!

you could be talking a bull-nose, or a leveling out (like a ski slope) of the roof deck over the eaves. So, until I know what you are talking about, I certainly can’t be of any help.

I think I know what their talking about.

Awesome & beautiful design.

It’ll take a real craftsman to tackle that job!

Can’t wait for the pics before commenting,
but I think this is what they are talking about:

Like this?

http://www.rigov.org/images/MoSUS/30_ST_2200.jpg

If that’s it, the reason that it appears unsightly is because it wasn’t meant to have asphalt shingles on it, but rather wood shakes/shingles.

However, wanting to modify the rakes would be pretty straight-forward and easy.

Once the existing roof is removed, either the roofer or a carpenter will cut the detail back to the roof’s gable edge and probably sister in framing stock to extend the roof out a bit and build a new rake fascia or if possible, cut back just the section where it begins to curl and attach new fascia to that if it is structurally sound enough to do so.

Geez I’d love to get my hands on that roof!

:mrgreen:

Don’t forget to make sure that the roof deck is removed at a half/whole pattern to properly support the eave.

I personally think it would be a shame to not have a steamed shingle applied on that house.

Hear, hear.

As I said, I’d love to get my hands on that job.

:expressionless: